Teaching Children Mathematics

Intended as a resource for elementary school students, teachers, and teacher educators, Teaching Children Mathematics (TCM) was focused on intuitive, exploratory investigations that used informal reasoning to help students develop a strong conceptual basis leading to greater mathematical abstraction. In its 25-year history, the journal's articles won numerous awards, including honors from the Society of National Association Publications.

 

As NCTM prepares to celebrate its centennial, the organization is also poised to implement in-depth strategic planning that positions the Council for a second century. The NCTM publishing program—and in particular, the journals program—has been instrumental in providing teachers with content to meet the needs of each and every learner and to help practitioners adapt to the ongoing pedagogical and technological changes in the educational landscape.

As students create and analyze mathematical knots, they develop their ability to reason spatially and engage in concepts not typically part of a geometry curriculum. Originally published in the May 2018 issue of TCM, this problem allows students to expand their understanding of mathematics by exploring knot theory.

Hundreds of species of animals around the world are losing their habitats and food supplies, are facing extinction, or have been hunted or otherwise negatively influenced by humans. Students learn about some of these animals and explore multiple solution strategies as they solve this month's problems. Math by the Month features collections of short activities focused on a monthly theme. These articles aim for an inquiry or problem-solving orientation that includes four activities each for grade bands K–2, 3–4, and 5–6.

Modifications to a first- and second-grade STEAM activity, Elephant Toothpaste, highlight ways to emphasize mathematical thinking by running multiple experiments, posing mathematical questions, and having students make both qualitative and quantitative observations. Contributors to the iSTEM department share ideas and activities that stimulate student interest in the integrated fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K–grade 5 classrooms.

Volunteers review books, software, and other products for the TCM audience.

Students come to school with varying degrees of prior mathematics experiences, understandings, and levels of confidence—all of which can be challenging for teachers. Below are three strategies based on Universal Design for Learning (cast.org) to highlight and leverage the mathematical brilliance of all children, including children with dis/abilities.

As the staff and Editorial Panel of twenty-five-year-old Teaching Children Mathematics (TCM) prepare to retire the journal, we would be remiss if we failed to acknowledge that TCM would not have existed for a quarter of a century without the voluntary efforts of many, many mathematics educators who have served as department editors, reviewers, and referees as well as members of the editorial panel.

 

Teaching Children Mathematics (TCM) made its debut in 1994, when The Arithmetic Teacher ended its 40-year run. Intended as a resource for elementary school students, teachers, and teacher educators, the focus of TCM was on intuitive, exploratory investigations that used informal reasoning to help students develop a strong conceptual basis leading to greater mathematical abstraction. In its 25-year history, the journal's articles won numerous awards, including honors from the Society of National Association Publications. TCM ended publication in May 2019.