Mathematics Teacher Educator

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) are excited to partner on this joint online journal.

Mathematics Teacher Educator contributes to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge.

In this editorial, an analysis of articles published in the Mathematics Teacher Educator journal (MTE) from 2012 to 2020, which describes the knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators addressed by MTE authors, is presented. This analysis builds on similar work conducted four years ago (Bieda, 2016). These more recent findings demonstrate that articles focusing on teacher knowledge; mathematical content; student thinking and reasoning; and models of teacher preparation or in-service professional development (PD) have been the most frequently published in MTE. In contrast, a limited number of articles have focused on discourse; diversity, equity, and language; technology; and methods of research. This examination allows us to assess as a community where we were, where we are, and where we might go in the future.

Developing expertise in professional noticing of students’ mathematical thinking takes time and meaningful learning experiences. We used the LessonSketch platform to create a learning experience for secondary preservice teachers (PSTs) involving an approximation of teaching practice to formatively assess PSTs’ noticing skills of students’ mathematical thinking. Our study showed that approximations of teaching practice embedded within platforms like LessonSketch can enable mathematics teacher educators (MTEs) to carry out effective formative assessment of PSTs’ professional noticing of students’ mathematical thinking that is meaningful for both PSTs and MTEs. The experience itself as well as its design features and framework used with the assessment can be applied in the work of MTEs who develop teachers’ professional noticing skills of students’ mathematical thinking.

This study investigates how the exploration phase of the teacher learning cycle provides 11 novice mathematics teachers with the opportunity to learn about the high-leverage practice of launching a complex task. Findings suggest that the exploration phase of the teacher learning cycle provides novice teachers with opportunities to reflect on how to launch a complex task within the context of their own instructional practice. Because of this opportunity to deeply consider the pedagogical resource and reflect on it, novice teachers’ instructional visions were a filter through which they interpreted key instructional strategies offered up during the exploration phase of the teacher learning cycle. Further, the authors discuss three key takeaways for teacher educators who are attempting to implement the teacher learning cycle into their teacher education coursework.

In this article, we present a set of design principles to guide the development of instructional materials aimed to support preservice secondary mathematics teachers (PSMTs) examining student practices in technology-mediated environments. To develop design principles, we drew on the literature related to technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK; Niess, 2005), video cases as learning objects (Sherin & van Es, 2005), and professional noticing (Jacobs, et al., 2010). After presenting the design principles, we share a task created using these design principles. Finally, we share PSMTs’ reflections about changes in their own understanding after examining students’ practices. Their responses provide insights into the usefulness of the design principles for deepening PSMTs’ mathematical knowledge and knowledge of students’ understanding, thinking, and learning with technology.

Undergraduate research is increasingly prevalent in many fields of study, but it is not yet widespread in mathematics education. We argue that expanding undergraduate research opportunities in mathematics education would be beneficial to the field. Such opportunities can be impactful as either extracurricular or course-embedded experiences. To help readers envision directions for undergraduate research experiences in mathematics education with prospective teachers, we describe a model built on a design-based research paradigm. The model engages pairs of prospective teachers in working with faculty mentors to design instructional sequences and test the extent to which they support children’s learning. Undergraduates learn about the nature of systematic mathematics education research and how careful analyses of classroom data can guide practice. Mentors gain opportunities to pursue their personal research interests while guiding undergraduate pairs. We explain how implementing the core cycle of the model, whether on a small or large scale, can help teachers make instructional decisions that are based on rich, qualitative classroom data.

MTE is a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal for practitioners in mathematics teacher education that is published twice a year. MTE contributes to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The audience for the journal is broadly defined as anyone who contributes to the preparation and professional development of pre-K–12 pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics. Mathematics teacher educators include mathematics educators, mathematicians, teacher leaders, school district mathematics experts, and others.

Editorial Board

  • Karen Hollebrands, Editor
  • Valerie Faulkner, Associate Editor
  • Panel Members
  • Jan Yow, Panel Chair
  • Laura Bofferding, Panel Member
  • Matt Campbell, Panel Member
  • Theodore Chao, Panel Member
  • Zandra de Araujo, Panel Member
  • Keith Leatham, Panel Member
  • Beth Kobett, NCTM Board Liaison
  • Eva Thanheiser, AMTE Board Liaison
  • Babette Benken, AMTE VP of Publications
  • David Barnes, NCTM Staff Liaison

 Headquarters Journal Staff

  • David E. Barnes, Associate Executive Director for Research, Learning, and Development
  • Ken Krehbiel, Executive Director
  • Eleanore Tapscott, Director of Publications
  • Tristan Coffelt, Sr. Production and Copy Editor

What to Write for MTE

The mission of the online journal Mathematics Teacher Educator (MTE) is to contribute to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The journal provides a forum for sharing practitioner knowledge related to the preparation and support of teachers of mathematics as well as for verifying and improving that knowledge over time. The journal is thus a tool that uses the personal knowledge that mathematics educators gain from their practice to build a trustworthy knowledge base that can be shared with the profession.

Therefore, all manuscripts should be crafted in a manner that makes the scholarly nature of the work apparent. Toward that end, manuscripts should contain a description of the problem or issue of mathematics teacher education that is addressed, the methods/interventions/tools that were used, the means by which these methods/interventions/tools and their results were studied and documented, and the application of the results to practice (both the authors’ practice and the larger community).

The nature of evidence in a practitioner journal is different from that in a research journal, but evidence is still critically important to ensuring the scholarly nature of the journal. Thus, authors must go beyond simply describing innovations to providing evidence of their effectiveness. Note that effectiveness implies that something is better and not just different as a result of the innovation. In addition, authors should make explicit the specific contribution to our knowledge. Findings should be reported with enough warrants to allow the construction or justification of recommendations for policy and practice.

Manuscript Preparation

Manuscripts should be no longer than 25 pages of text or 6,250 words (exclusive of references). For ease of reading by reviewers, all figures and tables should be embedded in the correct locations in the text. All manuscripts should be formatted according to the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition). Manuscripts not conforming to these specifications may be returned without review. Please submit manuscripts using the online manuscript submission and review system.

Because MTE is published online-only, authors are encouraged to take advantage of the possibilities of this medium by including items such as student work, videos, applets, hyperlinks, and other items that enhance the manuscript. Appropriate permission for such items must be submitted before a manuscript will be accepted for publication. In addition, color can be used to the extent that it enhances the submission.

Resources

So You Want to Be an MTE Author? A Tool for Writing Your Next MTE Manuscript

 

 

 

Mathematics Teacher Educator (MTE) is a scholarly, peer-reviewed online journal for practitioners. Two issues of this journal are published each year. NCTM members can add MTE as an additional subscription for $24 for Essential and Premium members, and $12 for Student and Emeritus members.

The primary audience of Mathematics Teacher Educator is practitioners in mathematics teacher education, with practitioner broadly defined as anyone who contributes to the preparation and professional development of pre-K–12 pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics. Mathematics teacher educators include but are not limited to mathematics educators, mathematicians, teacher leaders, school district mathematics experts, and professional development providers. Learn more about MTE now.

Access Free Version of MTE Journal