Mathematics Teacher Educator

About Mathematics Teacher Educator

 

Mission and Goals

Mathematics Teacher Educator works to build a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The journal provides a means for practitioner knowledge related to the preparation and support of teachers of mathematics to be not only public, shared, and stored, but also verified and improved over time (Hiebert, Gallimore, and Stigler 2002).

 

Mathematics Teacher Educator is a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal for practitioners. Three issues of the journal are published each year. Mathematics Teacher Educator is available to NCTM Premium Members. 

Hiebert, J., Gallimore, R., & Stigler, J. W. (2002). A Knowledge Base for the Teaching Profession: What Would It Look Like and How Can We Get One? Educational Research, 31, 3-15. https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X031005003 

To support teachers in implementing ambitious reform efforts, professional developers and teacher educators need to know more about teachers’ thinking about argumentation. Specifically, there is a need to understand more about teachers’ views and evaluations of students’ mathematical arguments as they play out in practice. In this article, we share a tool developed to elicit teachers’ pre- and postevaluations of students’ mathematical arguments on a problem-solving task. We discuss the design of the tool and provide evidence of its utility. Our findings indicate that the tool can be used to (a) identify changes in teachers’ evaluations of student mathematical arguments over time and (b) inform the design of professional learning experiences.

Research has shown that the ways in which teachers engage in professional development activities vary widely. identified three levels of teacher appropriation within professional development, with their inquiry stance indicative of teachers engaging in self-sustaining practices. In our project, we modified the demonstration lesson format so that teachers took an active role in changing an observed lesson and then viewing the impact of those changes as a second lesson was taught. We share evidence that this modified structure provided opportunities for teachers to engage in an inquiry stance on teaching and discuss implications for professional development providers in structuring activities to foster an inquiry stance.

Cognitively demanding tasks provide important opportunities for students to develop an understanding of mathematics; however, they are challenging to launch and implement. The authors designed a secondary methods unit on launching tasks. Participants in the study were enrolled in five different methods courses. Using a noticing framework, findings suggest that by engaging in the unit, preservice teachers developed a greater understanding of the four aspects of an effective task launch. When viewing video examples, preservice teachers were able to talk about the four aspects of a task launch with increased specificity. Additionally, they began to identify ways of developing common language without reducing cognitive demand. We discuss implications of this work and offer suggestions for future teacher education research.

The pervasiveness of digital technology creates an imperative for mathematics teacher educators to prepare preservice teachers (PSTs) to select technology to support students’ mathematical development. We report on research conducted on an assignment created for and implemented in secondary mathematics methods courses requiring PSTs to select and evaluate digital mathematics tools. We found that PSTs primarily focused on pedagogical fidelity (ease of use), did not consider mathematical fidelity (accuracy), and at times superficially attended to cognitive fidelity (how well the tool reflects students’ mathematical thinking processes) operationalized as the CCSS for Mathematical Practice and Five Strands of Mathematical Proficiency. We discuss implications for implementing the assignment and suggestions for addressing PSTs’ challenges with identifying the mathematical practices and five strands.

MTE is a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal for practitioners in mathematics teacher education that is published three times a year. MTE contributes to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The audience for the journal is broadly defined as anyone who contributes to the preparation and professional development of pre-K–12 pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics. Mathematics teacher educators include mathematics educators, mathematicians, teacher leaders, school district mathematics experts, and others.

Ethics Statement

MTE is committed to the ethical treatment of all involved in the publishing process. 

A guest editor is assigned to manuscripts authored by any individuals who have a conflict of interest with the editorial team. 

We expect manuscript authors to adhere to accepted publushing standards ethics. Authors must accept sole responsibility for the factual accuracy of their contributions and for obtaining permission to use data and copyrighted sources. 

Similarly, we expect reviewers to adhere to ethical reviewer practices. Reviewers should honor the confidentiality and intellectual property of manuscripts, should be respectful in communicating their feedback, and should provide feedback that is honest and unbiased. All communications regarding manuscripts are privileged. Reviewers are expected to report to the editor any conflict of interest, suspicion of duplicate publication, fabrication of data, or plagiarism. 

 

Editorial Board

  • Karen Hollebrands, Editor
  • Valerie Faulkner, Associate Editor

    Panel Members
  • Laura Bofferding, Panel Chair
  • Matt Campbell, Panel Member
  • Zandra de Araujo, Panel Member
  • Alison Castro Superfine, Panel Member
  • Keith Leatham, Panel Member
  • Rajeev Virmani, Panel Member
  • Beth Kobett, NCTM Board Liaison
  • Marielle Myers, AMTE Board Liaison
  • Babette Benken, AMTE VP of Publications
  • David Barnes, NCTM Staff Liaison

 Headquarters Journal Staff

  • David E. Barnes, Associate Executive Director
  • Ken Krehbiel, Executive Director
  • Eleanore Tapscott, Director of Publications
  • Tristan Coffelt, Production Manager

Mathematics Teacher Educator Acceptance Rate

The acceptance rate for the Mathemtics Teacher Educator journal is the percentage of submitted articles accepted during three consecutive calendar years; It is calculated by summing the total number of articles accepted (accept, accept with major revisions, and accept with minor revisions) and dividing that number by the total number of articles submitted (new manuscripts and revised manuscripts.) The acceptance rates are shown in the table that follows. 

Three year period Accepted Submitted Acceptance Rate
Jan 2014 - Dec 2016 24 214 11.20%
Jan 2015 - Dec 2017 25 177 14.10%
Jan 2016 - Dec 2018 24 153 15.70%
Jan 2017 - Dec 2019 30 163 18.40%
Jan 2018 - Oct 2020 26 183 14.20%

 

 

 

What to Write for MTE

The mission of the online journal Mathematics Teacher Educator (MTE) is to contribute to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The journal provides a forum for sharing practitioner knowledge related to the preparation and support of teachers of mathematics as well as for verifying and improving that knowledge over time. The journal is thus a tool that uses the personal knowledge that mathematics educators gain from their practice to build a trustworthy knowledge base that can be shared with the profession.

Therefore, all manuscripts should be crafted in a manner that makes the scholarly nature of the work apparent. Toward that end, manuscripts should contain a description of the problem or issue of mathematics teacher education that is addressed, the methods/interventions/tools that were used, the means by which these methods/interventions/tools and their results were studied and documented, and the application of the results to practice (both the authors’ practice and the larger community).

The nature of evidence in a practitioner journal is different from that in a research journal, but evidence is still critically important to ensuring the scholarly nature of the journal. Thus, authors must go beyond simply describing innovations to providing evidence of their effectiveness. Note that effectiveness implies that something is better and not just different as a result of the innovation. In addition, authors should make explicit the specific contribution to our knowledge. Findings should be reported with enough warrants to allow the construction or justification of recommendations for policy and practice.

Manuscript Preparation

Manuscripts should be no longer than 25 pages of text or 6,250 words (exclusive of references). For ease of reading by reviewers, all figures and tables should be embedded in the correct locations in the text. All manuscripts should be formatted according to the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (7th edition). Manuscripts not conforming to these specifications may be returned without review. Please submit manuscripts using the online manuscript submission and review system.

Because MTE is published online-only, authors are encouraged to take advantage of the possibilities of this medium by including items such as student work, videos, applets, hyperlinks, and other items that enhance the manuscript. Appropriate permission for such items must be submitted before a manuscript will be accepted for publication. In addition, color can be used to the extent that it enhances the submission.

Resources

So You Want to Be an MTE Author? A Tool for Writing Your Next MTE Manuscript

 

 

 

Mathematics Teacher Educator (MTE) is a scholarly, peer-reviewed online journal for practitioners. Effective with the 2021 volume year, three issues of this journal are published each year and subscription is included with NCTM Premium Membership.

The primary audience of Mathematics Teacher Educator is practitioners in mathematics teacher education, with practitioner broadly defined as anyone who contributes to the preparation and professional development of pre-K–12 pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics. Mathematics teacher educators include but are not limited to mathematics educators, mathematicians, teacher leaders, school district mathematics experts, and professional development providers. Learn more about MTE now.

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