Mathematics Teacher Educator

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) are excited to partner on this joint online journal.

Mathematics Teacher Educator contributes to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge.

In this editorial, I look back at what the Mathematics Teacher Educator journal has accomplished during its short existence. In particular, I examine how past editors and panelists have worked to clearly establish the unique identity of the journal. This clearly articulated vision has assisted in attracting well-aligned, high-quality manuscript submissions. It also provides educative scaffolds for authors, reviewers, and editors that have led to the publication of articles relevant to mathematics teacher educators. I then look forward to consider how we can harness the power of the internet to enrich readers' experiences with the journal. Many ways exist for an online journal to capitalize on technology to communicate, interact, and connect.

In this conceptual piece, I explore complex and contradictory conversations during an idea mapping task in which prospective elementary teachers interrogated dominant discourses within mathematics education, such as “mathematics is everywhere” and “being a math person.” I argue that this exercise of engaging with contradictions provided prospective teachers with opportunities to tease out nuances for reconstructing ideas that generate new perspectives for teaching and learning mathematics. Sharing my experience with the idea mapping task as a case study, I offer an alternative role for mathematics teacher educators to consider-as facilitators who create spaces for prospective teachers to interrogate complex and contradictory conversations within mathematics education.

In the last decade, mathematics teacher educators have begun to design learning opportunities for preservice mathematics teachers using a pedagogies-of-practice perspective. In particular, learning cycles provide a structure for engaging PSTs in learning to teach through the use of representations, approximations, and decompositions of practice (Grossman et al., 2009). In this article, we provide details of one learning cycle designed to support secondary mathematics preservice teachers' learning to elicit and use evidence of student thinking and pose purposeful questions (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2014). Through qualitative analyses conducted on learning reflections, we provide evidence of the impact on engagement of this cycle through the lens of the Framework for Learning to Teach (Hammerness et al., 2005).

We report results from a mathematics content course intended to help future teachers form a coherent perspective on topics related to multiplication, including whole-number multiplication and division, fraction arithmetic, proportional relationships, and linear functions. We used one meaning of multiplication, based in measurement and expressed as an equation, to support future teachers' understanding of these topics. We also used 2 types of length-based math drawings–double number lines and strip diagrams–as media with which to represent relationships among quantities and solve problems. To illustrate the promise of this approach, we share data in which future secondary mathematics teachers generated and explained without direct instruction sound methods for dividing by fractions and solving proportional relationships. The results are noteworthy, because these and other topics related to multiplication pose perennial challenges for many teachers.

Incorporating modeling activities into classroom instruction requires flexibility with pedagogical content knowledge and the ability to understand and interpret students' thinking, skills that teachers often develop through experience. One way to support preservice mathematics teachers' (PSMTs) proficiency with mathematical modeling is by incorporating modeling tasks into mathematics pedagogy courses, allowing PSMTs to engage with mathematical modeling as students and as future teachers. Eight PSMTs participated in a model-eliciting activity (MEA) in which they were asked to develop a model that describes the strength of the magnetic field generated by a solenoid. By engaging in mathematical modeling as students, these PSMTs became aware of their own proficiency with and understanding of mathematical modeling. By engaging in mathematical modeling as future teachers, these PSMTs were able to articulate the importance of incorporating MEAs into their own instruction.

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics expresses its appreciation to the following for their roles as program reviewers for the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation in the 2018-2019 academic year

MTE is a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal for practitioners in mathematics teacher education that is published twice a year. MTE contributes to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The audience for the journal is broadly defined as anyone who contributes to the preparation and professional development of pre-K–12 pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics. Mathematics teacher educators include mathematics educators, mathematicians, teacher leaders, school district mathematics experts, and others.

Editorial Board

  • Karen Hollebrands, Editor
  • Valerie Faulkner, Associate Editor
  • Panel Members
  • Jan Yow, Panel Chair
  • Laura Bofferding, Panel Member
  • Matt Campbell, Panel Member
  • Theodore Chao, Panel Member
  • Zandra de Araujo, Panel Member
  • Keith Leatham, Panel Member
  • Beth Kobett, NCTM Board Liaison
  • Eva Thanheiser, AMTE Board Liaison
  • Babette Benken, AMTE VP of Publications
  • David Barnes, NCTM Staff Liaison

 Headquarters Journal Staff

  • David E. Barnes, Associate Executive Director for Research, Learning, and Development
  • Ken Krehbiel, Executive Director
  • Eleanore Tapscott, Director of Publications
  • Aisha Jamil, Sr. Production and Copy Editor (Consultant)

What to Write for MTE

The mission of the online journal Mathematics Teacher Educator (MTE) is to contribute to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The journal provides a forum for sharing practitioner knowledge related to the preparation and support of teachers of mathematics as well as for verifying and improving that knowledge over time. The journal is thus a tool that uses the personal knowledge that mathematics educators gain from their practice to build a trustworthy knowledge base that can be shared with the profession.

Therefore, all manuscripts should be crafted in a manner that makes the scholarly nature of the work apparent. Toward that end, manuscripts should contain a description of the problem or issue of mathematics teacher education that is addressed, the methods/interventions/tools that were used, the means by which these methods/interventions/tools and their results were studied and documented, and the application of the results to practice (both the authors’ practice and the larger community).

The nature of evidence in a practitioner journal is different from that in a research journal, but evidence is still critically important to ensuring the scholarly nature of the journal. Thus, authors must go beyond simply describing innovations to providing evidence of their effectiveness. Note that effectiveness implies that something is better and not just different as a result of the innovation. In addition, authors should make explicit the specific contribution to our knowledge. Findings should be reported with enough warrants to allow the construction or justification of recommendations for policy and practice.

Manuscript Preparation

Manuscripts should be no longer than 25 pages of text or 6,250 words (exclusive of references). For ease of reading by reviewers, all figures and tables should be embedded in the correct locations in the text. All manuscripts should be formatted according to the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition). Manuscripts not conforming to these specifications may be returned without review. Please submit manuscripts using the online manuscript submission and review system.

Because MTE is published online-only, authors are encouraged to take advantage of the possibilities of this medium by including items such as student work, videos, applets, hyperlinks, and other items that enhance the manuscript. Appropriate permission for such items must be submitted before a manuscript will be accepted for publication. In addition, color can be used to the extent that it enhances the submission.

Resources

Current call for manuscripts:  MTE Special Issue: Equity, Identity, and Power Manuscripts  

So You Want to Be an MTE Author? A Tool for Writing Your Next MTE Manuscript

 

 

 

Mathematics Teacher Educator (MTE) is a scholarly, peer-reviewed online journal for practitioners. Two issues of this journal are published each year. NCTM members can add MTE as an additional subscription for $24 for Essential and Premium members, and $12 for Student and Emeritus members.

The primary audience of Mathematics Teacher Educator is practitioners in mathematics teacher education, with practitioner broadly defined as anyone who contributes to the preparation and professional development of pre-K–12 pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics. Mathematics teacher educators include but are not limited to mathematics educators, mathematicians, teacher leaders, school district mathematics experts, and professional development providers. Learn more about MTE now.

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