Visions of the Possible: Using Drawings to Elicit and Support Visions of Teaching Mathematics

Mathematics Teacher Educators (MTEs) help preservice teachers in transitioning from students to teachers of mathematics. They support PSTs in shifting what they notice and envision to align with the collective vision encoded in the AMTE and NCTM standards. This study analyzes drawings and descriptions completed at the beginning and end of a one-year teacher education program—snapshots depicting optimized visions of teaching and learning mathematics. This study analyzed drawings-and-descriptions by cohort and by participants. The findings suggest that the task can be used as formative assessment to inform supports for specific PSTs such as choosing a cooperating teacher or coursework that challenges problematic beliefs. It can also be used as summative assessment to inform revision of coursework for the next cohort.

Footnotes

This article was edited by Sandra Crespo, editor of MTE at the time the manuscript was initially submitted.

Contributor Notes

Jennifer Ruef, University of Oregon; jenny.ruef@gmail.com

(Corresponding author is Ruef jenny.ruef@gmail.com)
Mathematics Teacher Educator
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