The Mathematics Teacher

The award-winning Mathematics Teacher (MT) focused on improving mathematics instruction for grades 8–14 and supporting teacher education programs. It provided a forum for sharing activities and pedagogical strategies, deepening understanding of mathematical ideas, and linking mathematics education research to practice.

Since its inception, the Mathematical Lens column has provided teachers with resources to use with their students to make connections between mathematics and the world around us through the use of photographs. The editors and the dozens of teachers who submitted material for columns have taken all of us on a journey around the world to discover where mathematics lives. These columns have offered teachers a license to do mathematics everywhere and to travel far with their students with a full tank of resources.

There is a distinction between using technology as a tool for doing mathematical tasks and using it to develop conceptual understanding (Dick and Hollebrands 2011). In this article, the table feature of the TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is used in the second role, enabling students to participate in the reasoning and sense-making process. This article showcases four classroom activities that use tables as a dynamic tool for inquiry, applying numerical representations to algebraic, graphical, and geometric phenomena. Although these activities are presented using the TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator, other calculator and computer platforms can be employed; see the Teacher Guide in more4U for details.

The rise of dynamic modeling and 3-D design technologies provides appealing opportunities for mathematics teachers to reconsider a host of pedagogical issues in mathematics education, ranging from motivation to application and from visualization to physical manipulation. This article reports on a classroom teaching experiment about cube spinning, integrating traditional tools, GeoGebra (www.geogebra.org), and 3-D design and printing technologies. It highlights the rich interplay between worthwhile mathematical tasks and the strategic use of diverse technologies in sustaining sense making and problem solving with a group of prospective teachers.

To introduce sinusoidal functions, I use an animation of a Ferris wheel rotating for 60 seconds, with one seat labeled You (see fig. 1). Students draw a graph of their height above ground as a function of time with appropriate units and scales on both axes. Next a volunteer shares his or her graph. I then ask someone to share a different graph. I choose one student with a curved graph (see fig. 2a) and another with a piece-wise linear (sawtooth) graph (see fig. 2b).

The success of Mathematics Teacher is very much dependent on the volunteer efforts of many mathematics educators. Those who serve as department editors, manuscript referees, and publications and courseware reviewers include high school mathematics teachers, curriculum designers, college and university mathematicians, and teacher educators. Their contributions are deeply appreciated.

 

Mathematics Teacher (MT) had a long, illustrious history. Publication began in 1908. On February 24, 1920, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics organized in Cleveland, Ohio, shortly thereafter acquiring the MT journal from the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in the Middle States and Maryland, and changing publication from quarterly to eight issues per year.

As an official journal of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Mathematics Teacher was devoted to improving mathematics instruction from grades 8–14 and supporting teacher education programs. It provided a forum for sharing activities and pedagogical strategies, deepening understanding of mathematical ideas, and linking mathematics education research to practice.