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Laura R. Van Zoest and Shari L. Stockero

We draw on research into the durability of sociomathematical and professional norms to make a case for attending to productive norms in teacher education experiences. We illustrate that productive norms have the potential to support teacher learning by (a) improving teachers' own mathematical understanding, particularly of specialized content knowledge; (b) supporting teachers to productively view and analyze classroom practice; (c) providing teachers an experiential basis for thinking about fostering productive norms in their classrooms; and (d) helping teachers to develop professional dispositions that support continued learning from practice. This work points to the importance of intentionally considering the norms cultivated in teacher education experiences, assessing their productivity, and strategically focusing on those that provide the best support for teacher learning.

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Krista L. Strand and Katie Bailey

K-5 teachers deepen their understanding of the Common Core content standards by engaging in collaborative drawing activities during professional development workshops.

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Amy Roth McDuffie and Judith A. Morrison

Collecting, analyzing, and displaying data provide rich opportunities to connect mathematics and science concepts. However, mathematics and science teacher educators rarely work together to design tasks that connect mathematics and science. In this article, we describe collaboration between a mathematics teacher educator and a science teacher educator that included the design of an inquiry-based project for preservice elementary teachers to draw on the natural connections of these disciplines. We also discuss preservice teacher learning outcomes from the project and present recommendations for teacher educators.

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Mathematics Teacher: Learning and Teaching PK-12 (MTLT), NCTM's exciting, new journal with a unique point of view—your view as a practicing teacher of mathematics—is seeking submissions. MTLT will offer readers a plethora of relevant articles and enriching, useful departments enhanced with digital content. The journal will span PK-12 and will provide focused, grade-band-specific articles.

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Mathematics Teacher: Learning and Teaching PK-12 (MTLT), NCTM's exciting, new journal with a unique point of view—your view as a practicing teacher of mathematics—is seeking submissions. MTLT will offer readers a plethora of relevant articles and enriching, useful departments enhanced with digital content. The journal will span P-12 and will provide focused, grade-band-specific articles.

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Mathematics Teacher: Learning and Teaching PK-12 (MTLT), NCTM's exciting, new journal with a unique point of view—your view as a practicing teacher of mathematics—is seeking submissions. MTLT will offer readers a plethora of relevant articles and enriching, useful departments enhanced with digital content. The journal will span PK-12 and will provide focused, grade-band-specific articles.

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Janine T. Remillard and Martha B. Bryans

This study was prompted by the current availability of newly designed mathematics curriculum materials for elementary teachers. Seeking to understand the role that reform-oriented curricula might play in supporting teacher learning, we studied the ways in which 8 teachers in the same school used one such curriculum, Investigations in Number, Data, and Space (TERC, 1998). Findings revealed that teachers had orientations toward using curriculum materials that influenced the way they used them regardless of whether they agree with the mathematical vision within the materials. As a result, different uses of the curriculum led to different opportunities for student and teacher learning. Inexperienced teachers were most likely to take a piloting stance toward the curriculum and engage all of its resources fully. Findings suggest that reform efforts might include assisting teachers in examining unfamiliar curriculum resources and developing new approaches to using these materials.

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Nicole A. Bannister

Persistent disconnects within and among education research, practice, and policy are limiting the reach of professional mathematics teacher communities, one of the most promising levers for humanizing mathematics teaching and learning in schools. An overarching goal of this commentary is to convince the field of mathematics education to broaden our research agendas beyond individual classrooms to teacher collectives so that our combined efforts have a greater positive impact on how people experience mathematics in and out of school. The commentary begins with a focused review of extant literature on teacher community to establish context, clarify theoretical underpinnings, and describe three important problems of teacher community. The need for research on these problems is connected to the need for studies of mathematics teacher learning to better specify what counts as evidence of learning and how this evidence gets analyzed. In response, and for the sake of epistemological and ontological transparency, teacher learning is theorized from a community-of-practice perspective. A frame analysis methodology for empirical analysis of collaborative mathematics teacher learning within professional teacher community contexts is theorized, thereby contributing provisional tools for the field to use in this work.

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Gina Post and Stephanie Varoz

Supporters of the current reform efforts in mathematics envision ways of teaching that engage students in meaningful tasks and create communities where students can discuss and reflect on their learning. Becoming such a teacher requires learning new pedagogical strategies, knowing how children learn, and reflecting on one's own understanding of mathematical knowledge and practice. As both prospective and practicing teachers participate in a variety of learning experiences, they revise their conceptions of mathematics instruction and develop new forms of practice. Two predominant contexts for teacher learning are preservice teacher education programs and in-service professional development opportunities. However, research demonstrates that both contexts face distinct problems for developing reform-oriented practices (Borko and Putnam 1996). Prospective teachers exposed to reform-oriented pedagogy by university faculty in teacher education programs often discover that teaching practices in student field placements remain extremely traditional and authoritarian (Borko et al. 1992). This failure to provide field experiences that model standards-based practices often encourages traditional teaching routines (Eisenhart et al. 1993; McNamara 1995).