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W. D. Reeve and Homer Howard

Any learning is an active process, a matter of personal development which comes about largely as the result of surmounting difficulties. Thus student teaching is a means of promoting growth through meeting issues, situations, and problems, under wise guidance.

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William S. Bush, Marvin T. Moss and Michael J. Seiler

Student teaching is a critical component of preservice teacher education. During this time preservice teachers begin the transition from student to teacher. They find out if they have the desire or skills to teach. Their views and attitudes toward teaching, mathematics, and students are developed and challenged. In this setting, the subsequent success or failure as a teacher is often formed.

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Katye O. Sowell and Katharine W. Hodgin

Undergraduate students who are preparing to teach mathematics need as many opportunities as possible to engage in simulated or actual teaching. Planning lessons, constructing situations to facilitate learning, and communicating with learners are skills that are best learned through practice. At East Carolina University, the students enrolled in a course entitled “The Teaching of Mathematics” are given two quite different opportunities to teach under supervision during the quarter preceding their student teaching in a secondary school.

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Matthew A. Carlton and Mary V. Mortlock

The mathematical branch of probability has its origins in games and gambling. And so it is not surprising that our most common examples for teaching probability in the classroom—coins, dice, and cards—come from this domain. But how else can we teach probability, once these basic examples have been exhausted? Television game shows provide an answer. What we present here is just one of the game shows we have used to introduce students to several aspects of statistics and probability and to spark their interest in these topics.

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Erik D. Jacobson

This study (n = 1,044) used data from the Teacher Education and Development Study in Mathematics (TEDS-M) to examine the relationship between field experience focus (instruction- or exploration-focused), duration, and timing (early or not) and prospective elementary teachers' intertwined knowledge and beliefs about mathematics and mathematics learning. Early instruction-focused field experience (i.e., leading directly to classroom instruction) was positively related to the study outcomes in programs with such field experience of median or shorter duration. Moreover, the duration of instruction-focused field experience was positively related to study outcomes in programs without early instruction-focused field experience. By contrast, the duration of exploration-focused field experience (e.g., observation) was not related to the study outcomes. These findings suggest that field experience has important but largely overlooked relationships with prospective teachers' mathematical knowledge and beliefs. Implications for future research are discussed.

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Sarah A. Roller

Teachers and mathematics teacher education scholars have identified field experiences and quality mentoring as influential components of math teacher preparation and development. Yet, quality mentoring is a complex and demanding practice. Providing educative feedback to novices, particularly that which encourages reflection versus evaluation, can be challenging work for mentors. To study the potential of an intervention for providing professional development for mentors, I worked with pairs of mentors and prospective teachers (PSTs) offering Smith's (2009) noticing and wondering language as a way of structuring mentoring conversations that maintain both descriptive and interpretive analytic stances. Analysis of before and after conversations provided evidence of how mentor-PST pairs adopted noticing and wondering language, and in particular illuminated the ways in which the language structure might support interpretive mentoring conversations for studying teaching. The results suggest that mathematics teacher educators may want to consider what makes wondering challenging work and how to best support wondering in educative mentoring conversations.

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Of The fifty-nine books bearing Raleigh Schorling's name, forty-four are secondary school mathematics texts, seven deal with the teaching of mathematics, five are concerned with student teaching in general and three with still more general educational questions.

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Shirley Stillinger Brewer

Recently, while engaged in student teaching at The University of Texas, the author worked with a unique method of solving arithmetic word problems which was so successful that she wants to share this technique with other teachers.

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James K. Bidwell

Relevance is one of the current key words in undergraduate methods classes for prospective teachers. We have long realized that “talking about” teaching does not provide a sufficient basis even for student teaching experiences. Generally, contact with public school students is desirable prior to student teaching. However, it is often difficult to make the necessary administrative arrangements to provide additional exposure time for college students. As a partial answer to this problem, an experimental tutoring program was instituted at the University of Michigan. What follows is an account of the origin of this program and its development during the school years 1969-70 and 1970-71.

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Lewis H. Walker and Lynn S. Waldron

Typical of many teacher preparation programs, the preservice teachers at Lander University in Greenwood, South Carolina, engage in a number of field experiences prior to their extended student teaching. During the field experience that immediately precedes student teaching, each preservice teacher spends fifty hours working with students in a single classroom. In preparation for this experience, the preservice teachers develop and design ten-day units centering on social studies that integrate mathematics, language arts, natural science, health, and the creative and kinesthetic arts. One requirement of designing the unit is to include at least two integrated lessons involving mathematics in which the classroom students operate outside the school classroom.