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Linda M. Russo and Marian R. C. Passannante

A Statistics units in which students learn to determine factors related to their health while employing community resources and spreadsheet technology. Activity sheets are included.

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Dianne S. Goldsby

AS NCTM'S Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (2000) points out, students should work directly with data to understand the fundamentals of statistical ideas. Teachers should also introduce statistics in a way that will capture the attention of students of varying abilities and interests. The constructivist approach to teaching emphasizes the idea that students work better when presented with tasks that are meaningful and relevant; in other words, they expend energy on topics that interest them (Brahier 2000). One way to harness that energy in the classroom is to teach with music, an area of interest for most middle school and high school students. This article describes the use of the 1950s hit “Lollipop” (Ross and Dixon 1986), heard in the movie Stand by Me, as a launching point to introduce ideas of counting, working with frequency tables, and graphing data.

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Clarence E. Olander

Statistics is being recognized as a suitable course for high schools. Here is one high school's answer to the demand for more statistics in the high school program.

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Stephanie A. Casey and Jonathan D. Bostic

Implementing the practice of looking for and making use of structure differs when addressing statistics content standards compared with mathematics content standards. Read about suggestions for tuning out noise in data to teach SMP 7 in statistics.

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Randall E. Groth

The purpose of this article is to sketch a hypothetical descriptive framework of statis-tical knowledge for teaching. Because statistics is a discipline in its own right rather than a branch of mathematics, the knowledge needed to teach statistics is likely to differ from the knowledge needed to teach mathematics. Doing statistics involves many primarily nonmathematical activities, such as building meaning for data by examining the context and choosing appropriate study designs to answer questions of interest. Although there are differences between mathematics and statistics, the two disciplines do share common ground in that statistics utilizes mathematics. This connection suggests that existing research on mathematical knowledge for teaching can help inform research on statistical knowledge for teaching. I propose the use of research from the Learning Mathematics for Teaching (LMT) project to help shape the discussion. I conclude by identifying areas of needed research and suggesting directions for teacher education efforts in statistics.

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Mathematics teachers are aware of a recent explosion of interest in statistics and its role in the high school curriculum. In fall 1999, an issue of the Mathematics Teacher will focus on statistics, and the Editorial Pane is seeking manuscripts for this focus issue. The special issue will examine many aspeets of the subject of statistics, including classroom practice and curriculum, applications, assessment and evaluation, and professional development. Because many readers of the Mathematics Teacher are practicing teachers, the Panel encourages articles that describe actual classroom experiences or activities, as well as those that explore some important statistical concepts.

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Mathematics teachers are aware of a recent explosion of interest in statistics and its role in the high school curriculum. In fall 1999, an issue of the Mathematics Teacher will focus on statistics, and the Editorial Panel is seeking manuscripts for this focus issue. The special issue will examine many aspects of the subject of statistics, including classroom practice and curriculum, applications, assessment and evaluation; and professional development. Because many readers of the Mathematics Teacher are practicing teachers, the Panel encourages articles that describe actual classroom experiences or activities, as well as those that explore some important statistical concepts.

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Thomas R. Scavo and Byron Petraroja

We had just returned from the science fair, and the scientific method was fresh in the students’ minds. In this context we introduced the following unit on data analysis, which we hoped would not only satisfy the district's elementary-statistics requirement but also involve the students in a long-term mathematics project in a meaningful and relevant way.

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Albert P. Shulte

It would be hard to overemphasize the importance of statistics in the daily life of the ordinary citizen. The presentation and interpretation of statistical information plays a part in determining the television shows from which one may select, whether the local school millage election will pass or fail, whether the airplane is “overbooked” on one's next trip, how many fish one is allowed to catch each day while on vacation, and whether one's favorite professional athlete will be able to negotiate a raise in pay for the coming season. Through the daily paper, through news and analysis programs on radio and TV, through commercials, and continually throughout sportcasts, the person in the street is bombarded with statistical information (or misinformation) and presented with reasoning based on statistics

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Hershey H. Friedman, Noemi Halpern and David Salb

A demonstration of how fictitious anecdotes, especially humorous ones, can be used to teach statistical concepts effectively and to dispel some common misconceptions in statistics.