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Kathy Liu Sun

The belief that mathematics ability is a fixed trait is particularly common and may be a key reason for many students' disinterest and underperformance in mathematics. This study investigates how mathematics teaching practices might contribute to students' beliefs about mathematics ability being a fixed or malleable trait (mindset). Through a synthesis of existing literature and an analysis of data from classroom observations, this article presents a framework of teaching practices and identifies how varying implementations of these practices can be classified along a continuum from conveying fixed-mindset messages to conveying growth-mindset messages related to mathematics ability.

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Erica Slate Young and Sarah Roller Dyess

author endeavored to find a solution to this issue. Coincidentally, this was near the time of the release of Boaler’s (2016) book on mathematical mindsets, which leveraged Dweck’s (2006a ) work on growth mindset. The first author decided to incorporate

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This department features reviews of software, books, and materials.

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Kathy Liu Sun

Share news about happenings in the field of elementary school mathematics education, views on matters pertaining to teaching and learning mathematics in the early childhood or elementary school years, and reactions to previously published opinion pieces or articles. Find detailed department submission guidelines at http:/www.nctm.org/WriteForTCM.

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Cynthia Townsend, David Slavit, and Amy Roth McDuffie

To support a growth mindset in students, consider components involving cognitive, social, and emotional aspects so that students can work within their zone of productive stuggle.

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Tim Granger

The beginning of the school year is an exciting time for everyone. Teachers and students are filled with enthusiasm about what the new year holds. Unfortunately, when I begin the first mathematics lesson of the year with my fifth graders, this enthusiasm is often replaced by myriad student anxieties. By the time that students reach fifth grade, they carry with them any number of negative feelings about school in general and mathematics in particular. How can I share with my students the beauty of mathematics if they have the mindset that mathematics is nothing more than numbers?

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Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.

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Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.

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Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.

Restricted access

Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.