Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 261 items for :

  • "Mathematical thinking" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Megan Nickels and Craig J. Cullen

A 14-year-old child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia participated in 52 weeks of robotics task-based interviews. We present 3 of her tasks from Weeks 1, 20, and 46 along with an overview of the complete 52 weeks. We compare the data from the tasks to Brousseau's (1997) Theory of Didactical Situations of Mathematics to answer our research questions: Can robotics play support the devolution of a fundamental situation to an adidactic situation of mathematics for children who are critically ill? When children with critical illness engage in robotics play, what are the key features of the robotics phenomenon that support devolution to an adidactic situation? We found evidence of the robotics supporting the devolution of a fundamental situation to an adidactic situation of mathematics in each robotics task and evidence of 4 key features (thick authenticity, feedback enabling autonomy, connectivity, and competence) of robotics play that support this devolution.

Restricted access

Azita Manouchehri, Pingping Zhang and Jenna Tague

With the publication of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Curriculum Standards document in 1989, nurturing students' mathematical thinking secure a prominent place in the discourse surrounding school curriculum and instructional redesign. Although the standards document did not provide a definition for mathematical thinking, the authors highlighted processes that could support its development, including problem solving, communicating ideas, building and justifying arguments, and reasoning formally and informally about potential mathematical relationships. Less articulated were ways that mathematical thinking may be supported toward the development of proving and prooflike reasoning among students (Maher and Martino 1996).

Restricted access

Stephanie Casey and Joel Amidon

title rather than building on the students’ mathematical thinking to reach the goal of the lesson. Erica, on the other hand, spent the debriefing discussing the instructor’s classroom management moves and the behavior of students in the class . Dr

Restricted access

Madhuvanti Anantharajan

researchers emphasize the importance of attending to young children’s mathematical thinking ( Carpenter et al., 1996 ; Carpenter et al., 2017 ; Clements & Sarama, 2009 ; Ginsburg, 1983 ). Attending to children’s understanding of counting involves attending

Restricted access

Jane F. Schielack, Dinah Chancellor and Kimberly M. Childs

Suggestions for an elementary school activity and questions to promote five types of mathematical thinking: modeling, logical analysis, inference, optimization, and abstraction.

Restricted access

Flexible mathematical thinking—the ability to generate and connect various representations of concepts—is useful in understanding mathematical structure and variation in problem solving. Of the many important reasoning habits listed in NCTM's Focus in High School Mathematics: Reasoning and Sense Making (2009, pp. 9–10), four habits complement flexible mathematical thinking.

Restricted access

Leone Burton

This paper argues that mathematical thinking is not thinking about the subject matter of mathematics but a style of thinking that is a function of panicular operations, processes, and dynamics recognizably mathematical. It further suggests that because mathematical thinking becomes confused with thinking about mathematics, there has been little success in separating process from content in the classroom presentation of the subject. A descriptive model of mathematical thinking is presented and then used to provide a practical response to the questions, Can mathematical thinking be taught? In what ways? The reacher is encouraged to recognize both what constitutes mathematical thinking, whether in the mathematics class or some other, and what conditions are necessary to foster it.

Restricted access

Terry Woods, Gaye Williams and Betsy McNeal

The relationship between normative patterns of social interaction and children's mathematical thinking was investigated in 5 classes (4 reform and 1 conventional) of 7- to 8-year-olds. In earlier studies, lessons from these classes had been analyzed for the nature of interaction broadly defined; the results indicated the existence of 4 types of classroom cultures (conventional textbook, conventional problem solving, strategy reporting, and inquiry/argument). In the current study, 42 lessons from this data resource were analyzed for children's mathematical thinking as verbalized in class discussions and for interaction patterns. These analyses were then combined to explore the relationship between interaction types and expressed mathematical thinking. The results suggest that increased complexity in children's expressed mathematical thinking was closely related to the types of interaction patterns that differentiated class discussions among the 4 classroom cultures.

Restricted access

Dianne S. Goldsby and Barbara Cozza

NCTM's Principles and Standards for School Mathematics emphasizes the need for all students to organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication and to communicate their mathematical thinking coherently to others (NCTM 2000). Writing helps students focus on their own understandings of mathematics: “Students gain insights into their thinking when they present their methods for solving problems, when they justify their reasoning to a classmate or teacher, or when they formulate a question about something that is puzzling them” (NCTM 2000, pp. 60–61).

Restricted access

Victoria R. Jacobs, Lisa L. C. Lamb and Randolph A. Philipp

The construct professional noticing of children's mathematical thinking is introduced as a way to begin to unpack the in-the-moment decision making that is foundational to the complex view of teaching endorsed in national reform documents. We define this expertise as a set of interrelated skills including (a) attending to children's strategies, (b) interpreting children's understandings, and (c) deciding how to respond on the basis of children's understandings. This construct was assessed in a cross-sectional study of 131 prospective and practicing teachers, differing in the amount of experience they had with children's mathematical thinking. The findings help to characterize what this expertise entails; provide snapshots of those with varied levels of expertise; and document that, given time, this expertise can be learned.