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C. Alan Riedesel

In the January 1970 issue of The Arithmetic Teacher, Burns and Davis reflected upon selected pioneer researches in elementary school mathematics.

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J. Fred Weaver

This bibliography of research on elementary-school mathematics represents a continuation of a series begun five years ago in The Arithmetic Teacher and brings this series up to date through the calendar year 1961.2

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Winifred T. Jay and Clarence W. Schminke

Don't close your eyes. It won't go away. Subtle sex bias in elementary schools isn't likely to disappear unless you do something about it. One way to begin is by recognizing that sex stereotyping may exist in the instructional materials used in elementary schools, or more specifically within elementary school mathematics textbooks.

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Paul C. Burns and Arnold R. Davis

In the first month of the Golden Jubilee Year, it seems appropriate to reflect upon selected pioneer researches on elementary school mathematics. This article presents thirty-four examples of research that touch the following eight topics: beginning instruction; content selection; role of drill and practice; basic operations; problem solving; readability and vocabulary; disability; history and summaries of research. Since most of the researches presented here are well known, the methods and results will be described only briefly; more important, they illustrate the tremendouszeal and insight with which elementary school mathematics, and the methods of teaching it, have been studied from the time of the initial professionalization of the subject matter for the elementary school (1915-20) to about the conclusion of World War II in 1945. This period corresponds roughly to the first twenty-five years of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

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C. Alan Riedesel

More than one fourth of journal-published research reports dealing with elementary school mathematics present results of a survey. These range in scope from surveys conducted by individual teachers to the ambitious International Study of Achievement in Mathematics.1 Surveys are used to study presently existing facts, opinions, motivations, behaviors, and attitudes. Surveys may be conducted in two ways, by census or by sample. A teacher may wish to conduct a census survey of all child ren in her room, while a supervisor may attempt to find information by sampling pupils in the district. Both kinds are helpful in finding the status of the mathematics program and in observing pupil and teacher behavior concerned with mathematics.

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Edited by J. Fred Weaver

Where can I get information about the nature of ongoing projects related to elementary school mathematics? Can I get the projects' instructional materials to use with children in my own classroom?”

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George W. Bright

As the emphasis of elementary school mathematics moves toward more problem solving and more use of technology, students' understanding of concepts and ideas will become increasingly important. Without clear understanding of concepts and ideas, students are unlikely to be able to apply mathematics in everyday situations. This article illustrates one way to use data base software to develop conceptual understanding.

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Gaea Leinhardt and Ralph R. Putnam

Edited by Leroy G. Callahan

Over the last five years considerable interest and research have been generated about the contrast between novice and expert teachers of elementary school mathematics. Researchers hope that making this contrast will reveal important insights into the nature of expertise—what it means to be an expert mathematics teacher.

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William H. Nibbelink, Susan R. Stockdale and Matadial Mangru

Most assignments of sex to roles in elementary school mathematics text-books are made using story problems. Since such problems are usually fict itious, producing a nonsexist mathematicstextbook is a relatively easy task. (A textbook on the Uni ted States presidency is not afforded such luxury.)

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Albert P. Shulte

Edited by Leroy G. Callahan

Many curriculum groups and individual have recommended the inclusion of topics in probability in the elementary school mathematics program. In “A Case for Probability,” an important position statement in this journal, Jones (1970) recommended probability because (a) the subject deals with idea and pattern that grow over time; and (b) evidence suggests that appropriate units can be taught in the elementary school.