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Carolyn M. Jones

Connecting mathematical thinking to the natural world can be as simple as looking up to the sky. Volunteer bird watchers around the world help scientists gather data about bird populations. Counting all the birds in a large flock is impossible, so reasonable estimates are made using techniques such as those described in this problem scenario. Scientists draw on these estimates to describe trends in the populations of certain species and to identify areas for further research.

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Henry Borenson

An operational understanding of the equal sign can hinder learning its relational meaning.

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Rochelle Goldberg Kaplan and Sandra Alon

Professional development equips practitioners with skills to enhance student learning.

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Melinda (Mindy) S. Eichhorn, Peter J. DiMauro, Courtney Lacson and Barbara Dennie

Teachers can use Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in their math classroom to anticipate potential barriers, know which tools will engage students, and provide safe spaces for learning.

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Aisling Leavy, Mairéad Hourigan and Áine McMahon

One of the first math symbols introduced=the equals sign=underpins much of the algebraic reasoning a child will use in later years.

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Jill M. Raisor and Rick A. Hudson

Exploring structure through the use of a familiar object allows very young children to develop an understanding of several concepts at one time.

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Dan Battey, Rebecca A. Neal and Jessica Hunsdon

How we handle classroom relationships between teachers and students plays an important role in how all students experience mathematics.

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Sarah A. Roller, Elizabeth P. Cunningham and Katherine Ariemma Marin

Use photographs as a formative assessment tool.

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Ann H. Wallace, Mary J. White and Ryan Stone

Observing in Mary White's kindergarten classroom is like watching a beehive: hustle and bustle all around. Children work puzzles, create artwork, build with blocks, read books, and write their own stories.

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Haiwen Chu and Leslie Hamburger

Five types of engaging peer-interaction structures can support English learners as they make sense of mathematics and explore important mathematical relationships.