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Bobson Wong and Larisa Bukalov

Parallel geometry tasks with four levels of complexity involve students in writing and understanding proof.

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James Metz

Students analyze a photograph to solve mathematical questions related to the images captured in the photograph. This month, photographs of ceiling trusses provide a setting for a geometry discussion.

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Adam Lavallee and Stephen E. J. Armitage

Students analyze media items to answer related mathematical questions. This month's clips feature a percentage discount and a walking tour of Manhattan, which leads to probability and geometry questions.

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Casey Hord, Samantha Marita, Jennifer B. Walsh, Taylor-Marie Tomaro, and Kiyana Gordon

Emotional and contextual support can help students step toward confidence and success with challenging mathematics.

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James Metz

In the 1928 movie Steamboat Bill, Jr., as Buster Keaton stands in front of a house, the front wall of the house falls toward him. Keaton is unharmed as the open attic window passes over him. See photographs 1 and 2 for two views of the scene.

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Thérèse Cozzo and Joseph Cozzo

This lesson provides an opportunity for students to use mathematical modeling and explore right-triangle trigonometry in the context of protecting battleships.

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Arsalan Wares

Determining exact values of trigonometric ratios remains an integral part of the high school mathematics curriculum. Students learn to use 45-45-90° triangles and 30-60-90° triangles to determine exact function values of angles of 30°, 45°, and 60°. Such exact-value ratios can help to determine trigonometric ratios for nonstandard angle measures when trigonometric identities and algebra are used. In this lesson, students apply a geometric approach to determine exact-value trig ratios for angle measures of 22.5°, 67.5°, 15°, and 75°. Some students can extend that approach to other nonstandard angle measures.

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Steven Bannat

My favorite lesson is my lighthearted introduction to righttriangle trigonometry. I explain that we are starting a lesson that connects to the social studies curriculum—specifically, the Lewis and Clark expedition.

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Michael S. Meagher, Michael Todd Edwards, and S. Asli Özgün-Koca

The Geoboard Triangle Quest yields many results. The challenge for students is to verify which—if any—are correct.