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Becky Hall and Rich Giacin

Tying your teaching approach to the Common Core Standard for Geometry and Congruence will help students understand why functions behave as they do.

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Heather Lynn Johnson, Peter Hornbein and Sumbal Azeem

A computer activity helps students make sense of relationships between quantities.

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Michael J. Bossé, Kathleen Lynch-Davis, Kwaku Adu-Gyamfi and Kayla Chandler

Teachers can use rich mathematical tasks to measure students' conceptual understanding.

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Jennifer L. Jensen

Five problems—relating to gas mileage, the national debt, store sales, shipping costs, and fish population—require students to use functions to connect mathematics to the real world.

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Craig J. Cullen, Joshua T. Hertel and Sheryl John

Technology can be used to manipulate mathematical objects dynamically while also facilitating and testing mathematical conjectures. We view these types of authentic mathematical explorations as closely aligned to the work of mathematicians and a valuable component of our students' educational experience. This viewpoint is supported by NCTM and the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM).

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Michael Weiss

Core content provides opportunities to focus on the structure of mathematical theory, proof, and anticipation of subsequent topics.

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Karen D. Campe

Mathematics teachers can use a broad range of technologies—calculators, computers, display systems, and others—as teaching and learning tools. Although actual access is influenced by budgets and demand, the important thing is to make the best use of the technology available. Whether you have one computer station for demonstration, a classroom set of graphing calculators, or a fully wired classroom, you can take steps to make your technology implementation most effective and successful.

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Amy F. Hillen and LuAnn Malik

A card-sorting task can help students extend their understanding of functions and functional relationships.

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Benjamin Dickman

Explore three original problems, the thinking behind their formulation, how they can be solved, and related extensions.