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Bridget Christenson and Anita A. Wager

The Balanced Mathematics framework addresses differential needs of all learners.

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Amy Noelle Parks, Tomoko Wakabayashi and Beth Hardin

Common preschool routines increase opportunities for children to develop important skills.

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Amy Noelle Parks and Diana Chang Blom

Capitalize on opportunities for mathematical concepts to emerge in common preschool contexts, such as doll corners and block centers.

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Temple A. Walkowiak

This is the second in a series of articles about the progression documents. The first one, on fractions, appeared in the November 2014 issue of Teaching Children Mathematics.

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Luann Voza

Arm your students for victory in the age-old battle to master subtraction with regrouping.

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Andrew Tyminski, Corey Drake and Tonia Land

Despite the prevalence of mathematics curriculum materials in elementary classrooms, most current mathematics methods texts provide little or no support for preservice teachers (PSTs) learning to use curriculum materials. To meet this need, we have designed and studied several modules intended to provide PSTs with opportunities to learn about and from the use of curriculum materials. This article describes our research related to 1 of these modules–Addition Starter Sentences. Our results examine the nature of PSTs' developing content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge, evidenced through their interactions with and reflections on Standards-based curriculum materials. We conclude with implications for mathematics teacher education research and practice.

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Tad Watanabe

“A mile wide and an inch deep” is an oftenrepeated criticism of U.S. mathematics curriculum. In 2006, NCTM published Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics: A Quest for Coherence to suggest important areas of emphasis for instruction. Many states produced new standards that were informed by the book. However, Charles (2008/2009) argues that we must address not only the mile-wide issue, by reducing the number of skill-focused standards, but also the inch-deep issue, by making essential understanding more explicit. Charles suggests that many useful resources are available to deal with the latter.

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E. Paul Goldenberg, June Mark and Al Cuoco

Although it is necessary to infuse courses and curricula with modern content, what is even more important is to give students the tools they will need in order to use, understand, and even make mathematics that does not yet exist. A curriculum organized around habits of mind tries to close the gap between what the users and makers of mathematics do and what they say (Cuoco, Goldenberg, and Mark 1996, p. 376).

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Karen L. Kritzer

Capitalize on natural opportunities to engage young children with math in their world, contribute to their kindergarten readiness, and develop five-year-old mathematicians.

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Stephen Phelps

Edited by Anna F. DeJarnette

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.