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Dionne I. Cross, Olufunke Adefope, Mi Yeon Lee and Arnulfo Pérez

Kindergartners and first-grade students listen excitedly to a modified storybook to guide their geometry activities.

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Johnnie Wilson

Observe a first-grade teacher's use of gesture as a mathematics teaching and learning tool in his classroom.

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Annie Perkins and Christy Pettis

This student problem explores how many different triangles can be produced on a geoboard.

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Tutita M. Casa

This instructional tool helps students engage in discussions that foster student reasoning, then settle on correct mathematics.

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M. Katherine Gavin and Karen G. Moylan

Research-based actions and practical ideas for implementation can help shape your differentiated instruction.

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Ariel Robinson

This preschool teacher uses differentiation and scaffolding techniques as she reads an informational text about patterns with her young students.

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Annie Perkins and Christy Pettis

Students are asked to solve a problem that involves viewing the characteristics of a square.

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Laurie St. Julien

Why would a person who is terrified of cockroaches use them in a math lesson? The idea for this investigation did not occur to me until I read a newspaper article that described Italian scientist Paolo Domenici's research about cockroaches' escape trajectories. In particular, he found that cockroaches have preferred escape trajectories of 90, 120, 150, and 180 degrees from the source of danger (Domenici et al. 2008). Because this real-world information presents a unique problem-solving context for fifth graders to explore angles formed by clockwise and counterclockwise rotations, I overcame my fear of the creatures to develop this investigation.

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Elaine Cerrato Fisher, George Roy and Charles (Andy) Reeves

Be inspired by a formerly timid third grader who now confidently conveys a new understanding of numbers, patterns, and their relationships as functions.

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Claire Riddell

Exploring how many pattern blocks will completely fill the Rocket Ship puzzle, students are challenged to use the most and fewest number of blocks possible. They have the opportunity to explore the composition and decomposition of shapes and generalize ideas about the relationship between the size of the pieces and the number of pieces. Each month, elementary school teachers are presented with a problem along with suggested instructional notes; asked to use the problem in their own classrooms; and encouraged to report solutions, strategies, reflections, and misconceptions to the journal audience.