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William S. Bush

Today's teachers are under pressure to produce results. At the national level, Congress sanctioned the Educational Testing Service in 1988 to compare states using the National Assessment of Educational Progress (National Center for Educational Statistics 1991). Continuing this trend toward national accountability, a national test in mathematics is anticipated in the next few years. In my state, Kentucky, schools will be rewarded or sanctioned depending on their students' performance on various types of assessment and on such factors as attendance and drop-out rates.

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William S. Bush

The state motto of Kentucky is “United We Stand—Divided We Fall.” Never has this creed been so evident than through the recent statewide mathematics education reform efforts in grades K–4. Over the past two years, university faculty, classroom teachers, school administrators, public policymakers, the Kentucky Department of Education, and corporations have developed partnerships to initiate systemic changes in the mathematics education of students in grades K–4. These groups banded together to enact for Kentucky the vision set forth by the Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics (NCTM 1989).

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William S. Bush

Five preservice teachers' perceived sources of teaching decisions were studied as the teachers proceeded through a course on methods of teaching secondary mathematics and through student reaching. They were interviewed before and after lessons they taught during the methods course and student teaching. The sources cited most often included rhe content of the methods course, school textbooks, suggestions made during teaching episodes in the methods course, past teachers' performances, and cooperating teachers' performances. Suggestions from cooperating teachers were cited more often than suggestions from rhe university supervisor. Limitations and suggestions for further research are discussed.

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Doug Bush and William S. Jones

Understanding the answers to “why” questions is an important part of secondary school mathematics. Over the past few years, we have taught naturally curious high school and college students who have asked these questions as they learned mathematics.

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William S. Bush and Ann Fiala

Problem solving has become the focus of the '80s. The Arithmetic Teacher and the Mathematics Teacher are full of article on problem solving; conference for mathematic teacher overflow with essions on problem solving; and more and more teachers of mathematics are jumping on the problem-solving bandwagon. If you are one of these teachers, this article should interest you.

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Charles S. Thompson and William S. Bush

Article describes a professional development project to increase teachers' understanding of proportional reasoning, the thinking patterns associated with proportional reasoning, and the applications of proportional reasoning across the middle-grades curriculum.

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William S. Bush, Marvin T. Moss and Michael J. Seiler

Student teaching is a critical component of preservice teacher education. During this time preservice teachers begin the transition from student to teacher. They find out if they have the desire or skills to teach. Their views and attitudes toward teaching, mathematics, and students are developed and challenged. In this setting, the subsequent success or failure as a teacher is often formed.

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Margaret Mohr-Schroeder, Robert N. Ronau, Susan Peters, Carl W. Lee and William S. Bush

This article describes the development and validation of two forms of the Geometry Assessments for Secondary Teachers (GAST), which were designed to assess teachers' knowledge for teaching geometry. Both forms were developed by teams of mathematicians, mathematics educators, psychometricians, and secondary classroom geometry teachers. Predictive validity for the GAST assessment was explored by observing and testing 157 teachers as well as administering pre– and post–tests to 3,698 students. The reliability coefficient for both GAST assessment forms was acceptable (r = .79). GAST assessment scores explained a statistically significant but small amount of the variance of student scores, demonstrating an effect that was greater than the number of years of teaching experience but smaller than the effect of having an advanced degree.