Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for

  • Author or Editor: Wayne Nirode x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

Although high school geometry could be a meaningful course in exploring, reasoning, proving, and communicating, it often lacks authentic proof and has become just another course in algebra. This article examines why geometry is important to learn and provides an outline of what that learning experience should be.

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

Using technology to solve triangle construction problems, students apply their knowledge of points of concurrency, coordinate geometry, and transformational geometry.

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

Using a 6-inch-square sheet of paper and a simple rule for creating a polygon, students can explore interesting area and perimeter problems.

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

Students create rules to form new quadrilaterals from existing ones, use dynamic geometry software to construct and make conjectures about these, and attempt to prove their conjectures.

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

Familiar sets of points defined by distances appear as unexpected shapes in larger-distance geometry.

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

Pictures and diagrams help high school geometry students develop reasoning and proof-writing skills.

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

During their work with statistics, students should be able to compare two treatments from a randomized experiment and use a simulation to determine statistical significance informally (CCSSI 2010a; CCSSI 2010b; Franklin et al. 2007). To achieve these goals, I developed a method to collect student data in my classroom from hands-on simulations. The advantage of hands-on simulations over using formulas is that students can develop a conceptual understanding of statistical significance when they see the variation that occurs from sample to sample as the results of the experiment are rerandomized each time the simulation runs. I first explain a specific classroom experiment and the hands-on simulation. I then describe how to use Google Forms and Google Sheets to convert the simulation data that students submit using their cell phones into a single column of data that can then be displayed as a dot plot.

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

What I wish I had known about implementing DG tasks when I began by teaching career!

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

One of my goals, as a geometry teacher, is for my students to develop a deep and flexible understanding of the written definition of a geometric object and the corresponding prototypical diagram. Providing students with opportunities to explore analogous problems is an ideal way to help foster this understanding. Two ways to do this is either to change the surface from a plane to a sphere or change the metric from Pythagorean distance to taxicab distance (where distance is defined as the sum of the horizontal and vertical components between two points). Using a different surface or metric can have dramatic effects on the appearance of geometric objects. For example, in spherical geometry, triangles that are impossible in plane geometry (such as triangles with three right or three obtuse angles) are now possible. In taxicab geometry, a circle now looks like a Euclidean square that has been rotated 45 degrees.

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

To address student misconceptions and promote student learning, use discussion questions as an alternative to reviewing assessments.