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Walter G. Secada

The mathematics education research community needs to help in setting an agenda for equity in mathematics education. We must become more conscious about whether our studies incorporate tacit ways of viewing the world that legitimate the social arrangements by which diverse student populations fail, or whether they provide us with the vision and understandings that go beyond merely labeling failure in different ways.

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Walter G. Secada

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Walter G. Secada

In What's Math Got to Do With It? Jo Boaler joins a heady list of public intellectuals such as Jo Sanders (1986) and Sheila Tobias (1994) who seek to engage public policy by explaining extant research to “just plain folk” (Lave, 1988) and to empower their audiences to “do something about it.” Boaler's audience is parents; the “it” is the dreary mathematics teaching that is provided to their children. In fact, one girl told Boaler: “In math, you have to remember; in other subjects, you can think about it” (p. 40). For parents and their children, Boaler presents alternatives, such as Emily Moskam's classroom at Greendale High School, in which mathematics is taught using complex problems that engage students and that result in authentic mathematical activity.

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Walter G. Secada

Edited by George M. A. Stanic

The involvement of parents in their children's education can take a number of forms. In their synthesis of the research literature. Tangri and Moles (1987) outlined three dimen-sions of parental involvement. First, it can refer to service in schools (e.g., participating in school governance activities, working in classrooms as paid aides or volunteers). Second, it can refer to home-school relationships (e.g., written and phone communications. home visits by teachers, parent- teacher conferences at school, parent education and training sponsored by the school). Finally, parental involvement can refer to support of learning activities at home (e.g., assisting with homework, tutoring, providing educational enrichment activities). It should be noted that in this article, “parent” refers to any adult caregiver in the home.

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Walter G. Secada, Karen C. Fuson and James W. Hall

An analysis of the transition from counting-all to counting-on identified three subskills: (a) counting-up from an arbitrary point, (b) shifting from the cardinal to the counting meaning of the first addend, and (c) beginning the count of the second addend with the next counting word. First-grade children were given tests to classify them as counting-all versus counting-on followed by tests of the subskills. Adequate subskill performance was strongly related to counting-on: All 28 count-on children demonstrated all three subskills or incorporated Subskill 2 into Subskill 3, whereas 36 of 45 count-all children failed to demonstrate one or more subskills. A posttest indicated that the subskills assessment alone had induced counting-on for 7 of the 9 count-all children who demonstrated all subskills. A random half of the children who initially lacked Subskills 2 and 3 were taught them in a single session and retested. Seven of the 8 instructed children counted-on, compared to 1 of 8 not instructed. The conceptual bases for the subskills are discussed.