Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Thomasenia Lott Adams x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Thomasenia Lott Adams

April 2020 Editorial

Restricted access

Christiana Robbins and Thomasenia Lott Adams

In his book Elements, Euclid established that certain numbers are the building blocks of our natural number system. He revealed that these natural numbers could be “decomposed” into their smallest units as products of specific numbers. Numbers that can only be factored by themselves and 1 are called “prime numbers” and comprise part of the basic building blocks of numbers.

Restricted access

Thomasenia Lott Adams and Fatma Aslan-Tutak

The sierpinski triangle, created in 1916, has some very interesting characteristics. It is an impressive and valuable topic for mathematical exploration, since it combines Euclidean geometry (triangles and measurement) with fractal geometry. The Sierpinski triangle, also known as the Sierpinski gasket, is a fractal formed from an equilateral triangle. It is one of the most popular fractals to construct and analyze in middle school mathematics lessons. Since the 1960s, it has been possible to design fractals using a computer program, especially the complex examples that are often difficult to construct by hand. However, students can easily duplicate the Sierpinski triangle.

Restricted access

Karen Singer Cohen and Thomasenia Lott Adams

The value of anticipating the answer as a problem solving technique. Article discusses questions to ask about the form of an answer and its relationship to the conditions of the problem. Includes several examples useful for all students to develop a problem solving strategy.

Restricted access

Edited by Juli K. Dixon, Thomasenia Lott Adams and Mary Ellen Hynes

The purpose of the “Investigations” department is to provide mathematically rich and inviting contexts in which children and their teachers solve problems, communicate, and reason. Investigations encourage students to make connections among mathematical ideas, as well as connections with contexts outside of mathematics. As students collaborate, experiment, explore, collect data, research various sources, and engage in activities during the investigation, they will have opportunities to represent their mathematical ideas in multiple ways.

Restricted access

Edited by Mary Ellen Hynes, Juli K. Dixon and Thomasenia Lott Adams

The purpose of the “Investigations” department is to provide mathematically rich and inviting contexts in which children and their teachers solve problems, communicate, and reason. Investigations encourage students to make connections among mathematical ideas, as well as connections with contexts outside of mathematics. As students collaborate, experiment, explore, collect data, research various sources, and engage in activities during the investigation, they will have opportunities to represent their mathematical ideas in multiple ways.