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Stephanie A. Casey

Students explore six tasks to develop criteria for finding an informal line of best fit.

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Stephanie Casey and Joel Amidon

Developing expertise in professional noticing of students’ mathematical thinking takes time and meaningful learning experiences. We used the LessonSketch platform to create a learning experience for secondary preservice teachers (PSTs) involving an approximation of teaching practice to formatively assess PSTs’ noticing skills of students’ mathematical thinking. Our study showed that approximations of teaching practice embedded within platforms like LessonSketch can enable mathematics teacher educators (MTEs) to carry out effective formative assessment of PSTs’ professional noticing of students’ mathematical thinking that is meaningful for both PSTs and MTEs. The experience itself as well as its design features and framework used with the assessment can be applied in the work of MTEs who develop teachers’ professional noticing skills of students’ mathematical thinking.

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Stephanie A. Casey and Jonathan D. Bostic

Implementing the practice of looking for and making use of structure differs when addressing statistics content standards compared with mathematics content standards. Read about suggestions for tuning out noise in data to teach SMP 7 in statistics.

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Kristin Lesseig, Stephanie Casey, Debra Monson, Erin E. Krupa and Maryann Huey

Effective mathematics teaching involves eliciting and interpreting student thinking, and then using students' current understandings as a basis for instruction. Research indicates these skills are not innate but can be acquired through structured experiences. In this article, we describe the development and implementation of an interview module aimed at supporting secondary preservice teachers' ability to elicit and use evidence of student thinking. Analysis of preservice teachers' noticing of student thinking across components of the interview module demonstrated positive benefits of the assignment. We share our design considerations and results, and offer potential adaptations to the module for other mathematics methods instructors interested in using the module to develop secondary preservice teachers' ability to notice student thinking.