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Robert Q. Berry III

A task-based interview is conducted with a fifth grader who is using an iPad application—a modified calculator that gives users visual feedback on their estimates for computational problems.

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Robert Q. Berry III

This article is about 8 African American middle school boys who have experienced success in mathematics. Working within a phenomenological methodological framework, the researcher investigated the limitations these students encounter and the compensating factors they experience. Critical race theory was the theoretical framework for this study; counter-storytelling was utilized to capture the boys' experiences, which is in stark contrast to the dominant literature concerning African American males and mathematics. Five themes emerged from the data: (a) early educational experiences, (b) recognition of abilities and how it was achieved, (c) support systems, (d) positive mathematical and academic identity, and (e) alternative identities.

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Robert Q. Berry III

As NCTM prepares to celebrate its centennial, the organization is also poised to implement in-depth strategic planning that positions the Council for a second century. The NCTM publishing program—and in particular, the journals program—has been instrumental in providing teachers with content to meet the needs of each and every learner and to help practitioners adapt to the ongoing pedagogical and technological changes in the educational landscape.

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Robert Q. Berry III and Mark W. Ellis

See how one seventh-grade teacher melds NCTM's Process Standards, CCSSM's Standards for Mathematical Practice, and multidimensional teaching to engage students.

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Robert Q. Berry III and Maryann S. Wickett

Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics 2000) highlights the Equity Principle by stating, “Excellence in mathematics education requires equity—high expectations and strong support for all students” (p. 12). Working toward equity requires mathematics educators to think about curriculum and instruction issues as well as mathematics teaching and learning within a larger context of society.

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Beverly L. Wood and Robert Q. Berry III

“in my opinion: Special pi day ahead: 3.14.15,” The authors discuss pi in a historical context. This department publishes brief news articles, announcements, and guest editorials on current mathematics education issues that stimulate the interest of TCM readers and cause them to think about an issue or consider a specific viewpoint about some aspect of mathematics education. “YouCubed: Broadening the conversation for supporting student success in mathematics,” Drawing on current research and best practices, YouCubed is a collaborative effort to empower learners to find the joy of mathematics through engaging in challenging tasks. The website offers short videos, appropriate for a broad audience of students, parents, and teachers, describing current research about mathematics education in the United States, brain research, proven pedagogical practices, and challenging K—grade 12 mathematical tasks. “The Standards for Mathematical Practice: A three-step implementation approach,” As students become more proficient with math models, they will be able to identify important quantities in everyday life situations and represent them verbally, graphically, pictorially, and symbolically.

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Peter T. Malcolm and Robert Q. Berry III

Technology from the Classroom is the venue for sharing articles that illustrate the effective use of technology in pre-K—grade 6 mathematics classrooms.

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Kateri Thunder and Robert Q. Berry III

Mathematics education has benefited from qualitative methodological approaches over the past 40 years across diverse topics. Although the number, type, and quality of qualitative research studies in mathematics education has changed, little is known about how a collective body of qualitative research findings contributes to our understanding of a particular topic within the field. Through a process of qualitative research metasynthesis, our knowledge base can be broadened to provide insights into attitudes, perceptions, interactions, structures, and behaviors relevant for mathematics teaching and learning. The purpose of this commentary is to provide a rationale, definition, and procedure to conduct qualitative metasynthesis as a means of synthesizing and interpreting qualitative studies in the field of mathematics education.

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Danny Bernard Martin and Introduction by: Robert Q. Berry III

From the Archives highlights articles from NCTM’s legacy journals, as chosen by leaders in mathematics education.

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Robert Q. Berry III, Basil M. Conway IV, Brian R. Lawler,, and John W. Staley

Ear to the Ground features voices from various corners of the mathematics education world.