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Robert E. Reys

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Robert E. Reys

The square array of letters below contains at least 56 words that are associated with mathematics. These words are arranged horizontally, vertically, or diagonally, and may be spelled frontwards or backwards.

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Robert E. Reys

The Arithmetic Teacher bas published more research studies in mathematics education than any other journal. This is quite an accomplishment: it becomes even more significant when you realize that the Arithmetic Teacher is not yet twenty years old! During this period, the type of research article published in the Arithmetic Teacher has undergone a complete metamorphosis. In addition to an improvement in the quality of articles, there has been a considerable change in manuscript style and format.

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Robert E. Reys

Institutions of higher education are having a difficult time filling positions requiring a doctorate in mathematics education. This study reports that about one half of the 83 national searches by institutions for mathematics educators for the 2005–06 academic year were unsuccessful. Salaries for assistant professors were slightly higher in departments/colleges of education than in mathematics departments.

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Robert E. Reys

Objectives: Students will visualize three-dimensional figures, construct a table, discover patterns in the table, and use patterns to make predictions.

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Robert E. Reys

How well can your students compute? What is their level of number sense? As teachers, we struggle with developing procedures and skills in our mathematics classes. We want students to be able to compute, and we also want them to understand what they are doing. Maintaining a proper balance between conceptual development and skills, whatever they are, presents a continuing challenge. You are invited to “Take Time for Action” and see how your students react to two very similar, but perhaps very different, situations.

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Robert E. Reys

In 1960 the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics, the major group influencing the modernization of college mathematics, published their recommendations for the mathematics preparation of elementary school teachers of mathematics., Subsequently, statewide conferences for mathematics educators from various educational institutions were conducted under the auspices of the Committee on Undergraduate Programs in Mathematics. In these meetings were discussed the problems of adequately training elementary school teachers of mathematics and possible avenues to an improved mathematics preparatory program. One of the statements issued at each of these meetings concerned the importance of each educational institution's critically examining its own mathematics program for elementary school teachers.

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Robert E. Reys

Estimation and mathematical thinking go hand i n hand. Both are multifaceted, and each involves many different processes. I feel that instruction in estimation provides a natural context not only to develop but also to practice many important thinking skills.

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Robert E. Reys

The no child left behind act (P.L. No.107-110, H.R. 1, 2001) mandates a highly qualified teacher in every classroom by the 2005–2006 school year. It sounds great, but what does it mean and can it be achieved? The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) calls for all teachers to hold a bachelor's degree, demonstrate competence in the subject matter that they teach, and have full state teacher certification; thus, their certification requirements cannot be waived nor can they have an “emergency, provisional, or temporary” certificate.

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Robert E. Reys

Classroom teacher of mathematics are witnessing an unprecedented period of proliferation in manipulative materials. Commerical catalogs list a great variety of available materials; professional journals carry many advertisements claiming that this device or that aid will provide a panacea for learning a certain mathematics topic; and professional meetings are frequently inundated with exhibits displaying new manipulative materials. This influx of newly available materials has precipitated many problems. The wide range of quality found among various materials has made the problem of selection much more difficult. It has made it impossible to list all ava ilable materials and discu s the merit-or lack of merit-of each. It has created doubts in some teachers minds about the educational value of the materials. It has rai cd additional teacher-oriented questions such as “What are some guidelines for selecting manipulative materials?” “What materials should be used?” “What arc some dos and don'ts of using them?”