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Peter Kloosterman

Overall scale scores from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) indicate that there was only minimal improvement in the mathematics performance of high school students between 1978 and 2004. Using recently released data from the Long-Term Trend (LTT) NAEP, this study describes the content covered on the LTT NAEP and the performance of 17-year-old students on that content. In addition, it demonstrates that although overall gains in performance were small, there were areas within mathematics in which performance improved substantially and others in which students in 2004 did not do as well as their counterparts of the 1970s and 1980s. Specifically, performance on 3 items involving multiplication of whole numbers by fractions deteriorated but performance improved on most tasks involving percents and geometry. Performance was stable on most items assessing algebraic reasoning and logical reasoning and was stable or improved modestly on items assessing estimation, interpretation of tables and graphs, and understanding of integers.

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Peter Kloosterman, Zachary Rutledge and Patricia Ann Kenney

Results of the long-term trend assessment (LTT) for middle-grades students show positive advancement.

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Crystal Walcott, Doris Mohr and Peter Kloosterman

Math results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) are discussed and compared with results found in other subjects.

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Diana V. Lambdin, Peter Kloosterman and Martin Johnson

How well do you think your students would do on the following problem? “An army bus holds 36 soldiers. If 1,128 soldiers are being bused to their training site, how many buses are needed?” Only 24 percent of a national sample of thirteen-year-olds answered the question correctly (Silver, Shapiro, and Deutsch 1993). Students commonly erred by giving such non-whole number answers as 31 1/3, 31.33, or 31 R 12. To obtain the correel, whole-number answer to this question, students must make sense of the problem, realizing that an additional bus or some other method of conveyance will be needed to transport the “leftover” soldiers. Researchers interested in studying the extent to which students disassociate sense-making from school mathematic have conducted careful analyses of students' solutions to this problem and a number of related problems (see. e.g., Silver, Shapiro, and Deutsch [1993]).

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Zachary Rutledge, Peter Kloosterman and Patricia Ann Kenney

Analysis of U.S. students' performance on the National Assessment of Educational Progress's Long-Term Trend program focuses on some questions on which student performance changed significantly between 1982 and 2004.

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Diana V. Lambdin and Peter Kloosterman

At NCTM annual meeting the JRME editorial staff always organizes a session at which potential author and reviewers can learn about the journal. News at this year's meeting included a change to use of the recently published fourth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association as the standard for preparing JRME manuscripts (see inside from cover for information on how to obtain the PublicaTion Manual).

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Janet Warfield and Peter Kloosterman

An analysis of fourth-grade results on the National Assessment of Education Progress from 1990 to 2003. Information from his article will help teachers inform instruction in the elementary mathematics classroom.

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Edited by Douglas H. Clements, Peter Kloosterman and Janet Parker

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Edited by Douglas H. Clements, Peter Kloosterman and Janet Parker

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Peter Kloosterman and Tracey L. J. Warren

Computer Aided Assessment of Mathematics focuses on assessment in college mathematics courses with a special focus on computer-based assessment as a means of providing partial credit and immediate feedback on student work. Written by Chris Sangwin, a senior lecturer in mathematics at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, the book is an important resource for mathematicians or software developers interested in understanding the promise and the pitfalls of using computers to assess student work in college courses. Each chapter of the book addresses a different issue so readers have the option of reading most of them out of order or selecting the chapters that are most valuable to them. Thus, in addition to describing Sangwin's perspectives on teaching and assessing mathematics, this review is designed to help readers decide which chapters in the book will be useful to them.