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Strange Geometry in Football

Paulo Tan

Field goal geometry provides the real-life tie-in to this activity involving angles.

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En/countering Inclusive Mathematics Education: A Case of Professional Learning

Paulo Tan and Kathleen King Thorius

Despite the push for inclusive mathematics education, students with disabilities continue to lack access to, and achievement in, rich mathematics learning opportunities. We assert that mathematics teacher educators have a central role in addressing these contradictions. This role includes enacting facilitative moves during mathematics teacher professional learning to encounter and counter social forces, which we denote in this article as en/counters. As part of a larger study, we explored the extent to which the use of an inclusive education-oriented tool, developed and introduced during a teacher learning program, elicited en/counters that mediated participants' learning toward inclusive mathematics education. We discuss shifts in participants' conversational content and focus on surrounding practices that involved students with disabilities and features of the tool and processes that supported these shifts, including specific facilitative moves that helped redirect deficit-focused conversations.

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Reimagining Inclusive Spaces for Mathematics Learning

Cathery Yeh, Trisha Sugita,, and Paulo Tan

We challenge traditional models of individual differentiation and share design principles that broaden competence and participation for all students, including those with disabilities.

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Cover Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths

Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.

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Chapter 1 The Power of Humanizing Mathematics Education

Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.

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Chapter 2 Expanding the Meaning of Mathematics

Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.

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Chapter 3 Mathematics Education as a Human Rights Issue

Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.

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Chapter 4 What Are Disabilities?

Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.

Restricted access

Chapter 5 Exploring Disability Knowledge and Identity as Tools for Humanizing Mathematics

Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.

Restricted access

Chapter 6 Powerful Mathematics Goals in the Individualized Educational Plan

Paulo Tan, Alexis Padilla, Erica N. Mason, and James Sheldon

Abstract

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths is about enhancing the practices of mathematics teachers by extending the concepts of access, equity, and empowerment to include students living with all types of disabilities. These students are rarely thought of as mathematics doers and thinkers, and so are seldom offered opportunities to engage in mathematics in meaningful and connected ways. Humanizing Disability examines the current mindset and pedagogy that students with different learning needs encounter, and then offers strategies and practices to humanize the mathematics experience for these students.

In the first part of the book, the authors lay out some key ideas about humanizing mathematics education for students with disabilities. As teachers of mathematics of teacher educators and students with disabilities, as well as with their own backgrounds as learners with identified disabilities, the authors’ case and perspective are informed by hands-on episodes of their work and their own lived experiences.

Foundational to the authors' advocacy are these compelling concepts:

  • Students with disabilities are mathematics doers and thinkers.

  • There are multiple ways of knowing and doing mathematics.

  • The idea that disability is a tragedy must be resisted.

  • Humanizing mathematics education is a matter of human rights to counter conventional, deficit-centered forms of education involving students with disabilities.

  • Humanizing the mathematics education of students with disabilities enhances the learning of all.

Theory and argument isn't practice, so Humanizing Disability offers practical examples of implementation through the exploration of singular cases of how an Individual Education Plan (IEP) can be a powerful tool for access, equity, and inclusivity for the disabled learner; of using funds of knowledge and of identity to navigate the education system; and of building inclusive classrooms and communities.

Humanizing Disability in Mathematics Education: Forging New Paths offers an inclusive way to think about mathematics education involving individuals with disabilities. It goes beyond the walls of the mathematics classrooms to address issues of dignity, access, and empowerment. For those whose mission it is to bring meaningful mathematics to each and every student, it is a must-have reference for your professional library.