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Nicholas H. Wasserman

The practice of problem posing is as important to develop as problem solving. The resulting explorations can be mathematically rich.

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Nicholas H. Wasserman

Ideas in statistics, probability, stochastic processes, and algebra follow the steps of a wandering professor.

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Nicholas H. Wasserman

Looking for a way to influence elementary school culture about mathematics prompted this author's use of graph-coloring problems in an activity with second graders.

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Nicholas H. Wasserman and Itar N. Arkan

The circle, so simple and yet complex, has fascinated mathematicians since the earliest civilizations. Archimedes, a well–known Greek mathematician born in 287 BCE, began to unravel part of the mystery involving π by applying iteration to the circle. Building on Euclid's postulates and theorems, Archimedes used iterations of inscribed and circumscribed regular polygons to find upper and lower bounds for the value of π. These bounds are close approximations of the value of π, and one is still used today: 22/7 differs from π only in the third place to the right of the decimal (see fig. 1).

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Nicholas H. Wasserman, Keith Weber, Timothy Fukawa-Connelly and Juan Pablo Mejía-Ramos

A 2D version of Cavalieri's Principle is productive for the teaching of area. In this manuscript, we consider an area-preserving transformation, “segment-skewing,” which provides alternative justification methods for area formulas, conceptual insights into statements about area, and foreshadows transitions about area in calculus via the Riemann integral.