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Mi Yeon Lee

This article describes students' difficulties in generating linear equations and suggests pedagogical strategies that teachers can use to support students' quantitative reasoning in generating linear equations.

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Mi Yeon Lee

Through this project-based unit, students engage in STEM fields by doing research and finding solutions to a real-world problem as an interior designer who is consulted to plan a children's recreation room. iSTEM (Integrating Science Technology Engineering in Mathematics) authors share ideas and activities that stimulate student interest in the integrated fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K–grade 6 classrooms.

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Mi Yeon Lee

This multipurpose activity can be used in STEM education with elementary school students to reinforce scientific concepts of such weather components as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and wind by integrating manipulation of online apps (technology), knowledge of graphing and data analysis (mathematics), and creation of a wind vane (engineering). iSTEM: Integrating Science Technology Engineering in the Mathematics authors share ideas and activities that stimulate student interest in the integrated fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K—grade 6 classrooms.

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Mi Yeon Lee

The goal of the project this month is for students to design and build a tinfoil boat that is capable of carrying the maximum weight with the least expense, learning the scientific concept of buoyancy; incorporating the technological tool of TinkerPlots; applying engineering principles to designing and building a boat; and using mathematical knowledge of area, graphs, and data analysis. Integrating Science Technology Engineering in Mathematics (iSTEM) is the venue for ideas and activities that stimulate student interest in these integrated fields in K–grade 6 classrooms.

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Mi Yeon Lee and Dionne Cross Francis

These activities can support elementary school teachers in building students' conceptions of measurement.

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Mi Yeon Lee and Terri L. Kurz

“More weight, longer shadow,” a student predicts before we begin measuring the lengths of our objects' shadows. Another third-grade student conjectures, “Standing-up objects make the shadow longer, and lying-down objects make the shadow shorter.”

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Terri L. Kurz and Mi Yeon Lee

Sometimes, teaching mathematics with a focus on conceptual understanding can be challenging. With the advent of standards and principles (CCSSI 2010; NCTM 2014) an emphasis has been placed on using tools for deeper mathematical understanding and learning with understanding. Specifically, there has been a movement to include opportunities for learners to engage in sense-making activities when exploring mathematical concepts (Schoenfeld 1992). Tools can be used to support sense making and the development of mathematical ideas, and numerous tools can support learning in geometry (e.g., geoboards, pattern blocks, three-dimensional shapes, and linking cubes). We focus on AngLegs®, which are linking rods that are becoming more common in the classroom.

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Mi Yeon Lee and Dionne Cross Francis

Activities generated from a children's book can support youngsters in developing conceptions of measurement.

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Terri L. Kurz, Mi Yeon Lee, Sarah Leming and Wendy Landis

Algebraic reasoning is often promoted through an analysis of and generalizations about patterns that appear in mathematics, in nature, or in everyday situations (Driscoll 1999; Kieran 2006; Lee 1996). In accordance with this tendency, the Common Core (CCSSI 2010) emphasizes finding patterns and expressing such regularity in repeated reasoning as an important mathematical practice. NCTM (2000) also recommends that students participate in patterning activities by asking them to describe numeric and geometric patterns; generalize patterns to predict what comes next while providing a rationale for their predictions; and represent patterns in multiple ways, including drawings, tables, symbols, and graphs.

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Terri L. Kurz, H. Bahadir Yanik and Mi Yeon Lee

Scoliosis, the curvature of the spine, is a medical condition that often affects youth. This article provides students with an opportunity to explore the geometry behind the spine's curvature. Students will first develop a method for measuring curvature and then compare their method to the commonly used Cobb method. Contributors to iSTEM: Integrating Science Technology Engineering in Mathematic share ideas and activities that stimulate student interest in the integrated fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K–grade 6 classrooms.