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Megan H. Wickstrom

Use quilting as a context to relate area to perimeter as well as an opportunity to examine second graders' conceptions and misconceptions about measurement.

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Megan H. Wickstrom

Finding volume is not always an easy task. Students need hands-on experiences with volume units to make sense of three dimensions. Comparing the quantity of familiar objects helps students foster conceptions of volume because the task requires attention to attributes, counting strategies, and connections to multiplication and capacity.

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Emily Dardis and Megan H. Wickstrom

Modifications to a first- and second-grade STEAM activity, Elephant Toothpaste, highlight ways to emphasize mathematical thinking by running multiple experiments, posing mathematical questions, and having students make both qualitative and quantitative observations. Contributors to the iSTEM department share ideas and activities that stimulate student interest in the integrated fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K–grade 5 classrooms.

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Megan H. Wickstrom and Tracy Aytes

Examine second-grade students' investigative processes, thinking, and revisions in this lesson using fish crackers.

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Megan H. Wickstrom, Elizabeth Fulton and Dacia Lackey

Use those multicolored linking bricks to help students connect measurement with an understanding of number and operations as well as fractions.

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Megan H. Wickstrom, Ruth Carr and Dacia Lackey

With the 2016 national park centennial and such initiatives as Find Your Park, students and teachers alike are encouraged to explore state and national parks as their outdoor classrooms. From terrain change to average daily temperature, many aspects of the outdoors can be explored through mathematics. Because of our location, several fifth-grade classrooms across our district have the opportunity to visit Yellowstone National Park. Exploring Yellowstone is both relevant and motivating for our students because most have already visited or learned about some features of the park. For these reasons, as teachers, we thought that Yellowstone could act as an ideal context in which to investigate measurement topics and engage in the process of mathematical modeling.

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Megan H. Wickstrom, Julie Nelson and Jean Chumbley

Within the context of gardening, students examine rectangles with the same perimeter to see if and how their areas differ.

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Megan H. Wickstrom and Lindsay M. Jurczak

Examine teaching strategies, students' conceptions and visualizations of length units, and conservation of length as first graders explore the meaning of an inch in the context of a garden inchworm.

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Megan H. Wickstrom and Matt B. Roscoe

During a middle school task, students compare the sizes of Lake Tahoe and Flathead Lake.