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Mary M. Lindquist

“Linkages,” our theme for this year's annual meeting, represents more than linking yesterday to tomorrow. It is about linking today. We need to link in many ways-with members, with each of the Affiliated Groups, with our committees and task forces, with the Headquarters staff, and with other professional groups. Most important, we need to link with our students, who are facing a much different world from the one that many of us experienced as students. We need to help them link ideas within mathematics and between mathematical topics and link mathematics to real-world problems. We need to strengthen many of our links, forge new ones, and sever some links to the past.

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Mary M. Lindquist

“Linkages,” Our Theme For This year's annual meeting, represents more than linking yesterday to tomorrow. It is about linking today. We need to link in many ways-with members, with each of the Affiliated Groups, with our committees and task forces, with the Headquarters staff, and with other professional groups. Most important, we need to link with our students. who are facing a much different world from the one that many of us experienced as students. We need to help them link ideas within mathematics and between mathematical topics and link mathematics to real-world problems. We need to strengthen many of our links, forge new ones, and sever some links to the past.

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Mary M. Lindquist

Ten years ago, critics of our education system produced A Nation at Risk. Many charged that too little was being done to educate our youth. Standards were too low, and students were not prepared to embrace the challenges and opportunities of the world around us. As our nation rallied on the shoreline anticipating the tides of change, one message rang out loud and clear: “We must change the education we provide our students today if we want to ensure their success in the future.”

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Mary M. Lindquist

Ten years ago. critics of our education system produced A Nation at Risk. Many charged that too little was being done to educate our youth. Standards were too low, and students were not prepared ro embrace the challenges and opportunities of the world arou nd us. As our nation rallied on the shoreline anticipatjng the tides of change. one message rang out loud and clear: “We must change the education we provide our students today if we want to e nsure their success in the future.”

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Mary M. Lindquist

“Linkages,” our theme for this year's annual meeting, represents more than lin king yeste rday to tomorrow. It is about linking today. We need to link in many ways—with members, with each of the Affiliated Groups, with our committees and task forces, with the Headquarters staff, and with other professional groups. Most important, we need to link with our students, who are facing a much different world from the one that many of us experienced as students. We need to help them link ideas within mathematics and between mathematical topics and link mathematics to real-world problems. We need to strengthen many of our links, forge new ones, and sever some links to the past.

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Edited by Mary M. Lindquist

Ten years ago, critics of our education system produced A Nation at Risk. Many charged that too little was being done to educate our youth. Standards were too low, and students were not prepared to embrace the challenges and opportunities of the world around us. As our nation rallied on the shoreline a anticipating the tides of change, one message rang out loud and clear: “We must change the education we provide our students today if we want to ensure their success in the future.”

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Mary M. Lindquist and James D. Gates

The remarks published here have been adapted from the Presidential Address at the 72d Annual Meeting of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics in Indianapolis, Indiana, 14 April 1994.

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Thomas P. Carpenter, Mary M. Lindquist, Westina Matthews and Edward A. Silver

The recent publication of the Report of the National Commission on Excellence in Education (1983) has focused national attention on the state of education in the United States and the academic achievement of students. The results of the third mathematics assessment of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) provide a basis for examining students’ performance in mathematics and how it has changed over the last decade.

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Sharon M. Soucy Mccrone, John A. Dossey, Ross Turner and Mary Montgomery Lindquist

The rising tide of numbers and statistics that occur in our daily lives signals a need for a fundamental broadening of our conception of what it means to be mathematically literate. The following problem illustrates a real-life situation that can be best understood by analyzing the underlying mathematics—that is, by using the skills that are known as mathematical literacy.

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Catherine A. Brown, Thomas P. Carpenter, Vicky L. Kouba, Mary M. Lindquist, Edward A. Silver and Jane O. Swafford

This article is the first of two articles reporting on the seventh-grade and eleventh- grade results of the fourth mathematics assessment of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) administered in 1986. The elementary school results appear in companion articles in the Arithmetic Teacher (Kouba et al. 1988a, 1988b). Secondary school data from previous national assessments have been reported in the Mathematics Teacher (see, e. g., Carpenter et al. [1980, 1983))