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Marian Small

Quilt investigations, such as the Barn quilt problem in the December 2008/January 2009 issue of Teaching Children Mathematics and its solutions in last month's issue, can spark interdisciplinary pursuits for teachers and exciting connections for the full range of elementary school students. This month, North Dakota's centennial quilt problem blends the mathematical strands of measurement, data and probability, geometry, and number.

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Marian Small

Quilt investigations, such as the Barn quilt problem in the December 2008/January 2009 issue of Teaching Children Mathematics and its solutions in last month's issue, can spark interdisciplinary pursuits for teachers and exciting connections for the full range of elementary school students. This month, North Dakota's centennial quilt problem blends the mathematical strands of measurement, data and probability, geometry, and number.

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Marian S. Small

The “investigations” section recognizes the importance of children's exploring hands-on and minds-on mathematics and, therefore, presents teachers with open-ended explorations to enhance mathematical instruction. These meaningful investigations are designed to he rich tasks that tend to evolve as they are conducted.

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Marian S. Small

Are you a grade 6-9 teacher looking for easily accessible data to support your attempts to teach using a problem-solving approach? An old telephone book may be a good place to start. The ideas suggested in this article present some starting points for using the telephone book and telephone numbers at the middle school and junior high school level to develop a variety of mathematical concepts and skills.

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Marian S. Small

Educators and parents are all aware of the importance of regularly talking to children to enhance their language development in particular and their intellectual growth in general. These experiences give children opportunities to experiment with language, to interact with others through a language medium, and to participate meaningfully in the world of ideas. When children learn language, they take pleasure in using words they hear from others in arrangements that express their own unique ideas and thoughts. They do not simply repeat sentences; they create them.