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Edited by Margaret S. Smith

Mathematics Teacher Educator is the first journal dedicated specifically to issues in mathematics teacher education, providing a much-needed forum for supporting and improving the practice of educating teachers of mathematics. As the Editorial Panel articulated in the call for manuscripts (http://www.amte.net/publications/mte), the mission of Mathematics Teacher Educator is “to contribute to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The journal provides a means for practitioner knowledge related to the preparation and support of teachers of mathematics to be not only shared but also verified and improved over time. The journal is a tool to build the personal knowledge that mathematics educators gain from their practice into a trustworthy knowledge base that can be shared with the profession.”

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Margaret S. Smith

Building a trustworthy knowledge base for mathematics teacher education–the mission of Mathematics Teacher Educator–requires that manuscripts convey more than stories of practice, however compelling. Manuscripts must include evidence of the effectiveness of the intervention being described beyond anecdotal claims or personal intuitions. As the Editorial Panel articulated in the call for manuscripts, “the nature of evidence in a practitioner journal is different from that in a research journal, but evidence is still critically important to ensuring the scholarly nature of the journal. Thus, authors must go beyond simply describing innovations to providing evidence of their effectiveness. Note that effectiveness implies that something is better and not just different as a result of the innovation.” Hence, claims must be supported by evidence. In this editorial, I discuss the nature of evidence appropriate for articles in Mathematics Teacher Educator

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Edited by Margaret S. Smith

As the editor of Mathematics Teacher Educator, I make decisions about whether to accept, reject, or ask for a revision of a manuscript based on the extent to which the manuscript addresses the review criteria that have been specified (see http://www.nctm.org/publications/content.aspx?id=34670). This requires a careful reading of the manuscript itself as well as the feedback from three reviewers (one of whom is a member of the Editorial Panel). The reviews provide me with additional information and insight on which to draw in making a decision. The reviews are not “averaged” in any way (e.g., one Accept, one Revise and Resubmit, and one Reject do not yield a Revise and Resubmit), nor does the majority rule (e.g., two Accepts and one Revise and Resubmit do not result in an Accept). It is important to look beyond the particular category a reviewer chooses to what the reviewer actually identifies as the strengths and weaknesses of the manuscript. Many times the reviewer might indicate Revise and Resubmit when in fact the review provided is more consistent with Reject (e.g., many essential elements are missing). Hence, the reviews help inform, but do not dictate, the editor's decision.

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Edited by Margaret S. Smith

The mission statement for Mathematics Teacher Educator states that the journal “will contribute to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge.” In this editorial, I will discuss what this means and how the members of the mathematics education community can contribute to the development of this knowledge base.

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Edited by Margaret S. Smith

The word tool has many different meanings. The definition perhaps most relevant to mathematics teacher education is “something (as an instrument or apparatus) used in performing an operation or necessary in the practice of a vocation or profession” (http://www.merriam-webster.com). Mathematics teacher educators use a variety of tools in both conducting research and supporting the preparation and professional development of teachers. In research, we use tools (e.g., observation protocols, assessment instruments, surveys) to collect data that will inform the question that is under investigation in a particular study or set of related studies. In designing and conducting professional education experiences for preservice and practicing teachers, we use tools to provide a scaffold for teacher learning–a structure that allows them to do something that would otherwise be challenging or even impossible to do (e.g., a guide for analyzing instructional tasks, a protocol for lesson planning, formative assessment lessons). Tools can also be used to communicate a standard or shared understanding of practice across the community of mathematics teacher educators, particularly practices that have been shown to support students' learning. According the National Academy of Education(1999, p. 35),

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Edited by Margaret S. Smith

As I indicated in my editorial in the inaugural issue of MTE, the publication of MTE represented an historical moment for mathematics teacher education, providing for the first time a much-needed forum for supporting and improving the practice of educating teachers of mathematics. This current issue of MTE, the last one for which I will serve as editor, seems an appropriate time to reflect on the successes of the journal to date and the challenges that the editorial board is actively addressing.

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Margaret Schwan Smith

Amajor goal of current reform efforts is to help students learn mathematics with understanding. “Good” mathematical tasks are an important starting point for developing mathematical understanding, but selecting and setting up good tasks does not guarantee a high level of student engagement (Smith and Stein 1998). Using such tasks can, and often does, present challenges for teachers and students.

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Margaret Smith, Victoria Bill and Mary Lynn Raith

This article provides an overview of the eight effective mathematics teaching practices first described in NCTM's Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All.

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Margaret S. Smith and Mary Kay Stein

Abstract

Five practices provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., CCSSM and Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

Long Description

5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions, 2nd edition, provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and NCTM’s Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

What’s new?

  • Guidance on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Details on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Expanded lesson planning discussion

Relevant for K – grade 12 mathematics teachers and the coaches, teacher educators, professional developers, and supervisors that support them.