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M. Kathleen Heid

A cautious return to public concern for the education of gifted and talented youth has been evident in recent years. Although the latter half of the seventies produced an increase in funding, personnel, statutes, and policies concerned with the education of the gifted and talented, financial support of programs still falls considerably short of meeting the needs of these young people (Mitchell and Erickson 1978, p. 15).

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M. Kathleen Heid

During the first 12 weeks of an applied calculus course, two classes of college students (n=39) studied calculus concepts using graphical and symbol-manipulation computer programs to perform routine manipulations. Only the last 3 weeks were spent on skill development. Class transcripts, student interviews, field notes, and test results were analyzed for patterns of understanding. Students showed better understanding of course concepts and performed almost as well on a final exam of routine skills as a class of 100 students who had practiced the skills for the entire 15 weeks.

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M. Kathleen Heid

Twenty-five years ago, a fast-food TV ad initiated a catchphrase, “Where's the beef?” The phrase, originally intended to point out the small amount of beef in fastfood hamburgers, evolved into a way to question the amount or substance of an idea or product. Adopted in popular culture, the phrase made its way into the 1984 vicepresidential debate, and reappeared in popular TV shows. It is now time for the phrase to make its way into discussions about mathematics education research. While reading all the manuscripts submitted to JRME over the past 2 years, a paraphrase of that statement frequently passed through my mind: “Where's the math?”

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M. Kathleen Heid

Whereas it is essential that JRME manuscripts employ careful, systematic, wellargued, and appropriately documented approaches, such technical expertise is not enough to merit publication in JRME. The direction given on the JRME Web site advises reviewers to address these questions, “Does the research extend or deepen our understanding of important issues in mathematics education? Does it have the potential to lead the field in new directions?” In other words, reviewers are asked to address the question of whether the study that is reported advances the field of mathematics education. Having reviewed hundreds of articles over the past 2 years, and having received and read over 2000 reviews, I have noticed a theme that appears again and again in reviews: Successful manuscripts advance the field of mathematics education.

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M. Kathleen Heid

In my inaugural JRME editorial (Heid, 2009), I discussed how it takes a community to produce a high-quality journal. Now, 954 manuscripts and almost 4 years later, it has become even clearer to me that the production of a preeminent journal such as JRME requires the highest quality scholarly and editorial work and that the caliber of that work depends on the many individuals who contribute to the effort.

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M. Kathleen Heid

This issue of the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education is the first in which my name appears as editor, and this occasion leads me to reflect on what contributes to the success of a journal such as JRME. That reflection starts with thinking about what previous editors have done to make it a success, and there is no better place to start than with the previous editor, Steve Williams, and his team.

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M. Kathleen Heid

Investigating the teaching and learning of mathematics is an international enterprise, and the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education regularly benefits from the insightful contributions of reviewers and authors from every corner of the earth. JRME has long been considered one of the top international journals in mathematics education research with a worldwide community of researchers in mathematics education among its authors, reviewers, and readers. As a matter of practice, the Editorial Panel of the journal seeks international scholars to help in reviewing submissions. Reviewers regularly advise authors on how to expand their articles for a broader audience and identify those articles that are likely to have a global appeal. Over the past few years, a major source of advice was been the JRME International Advisory Board (IAB): Janet Ainley, Toshiakira Fujii, Koeno Gravemeijer, Lucia Grugnetti, Gilah Leder, and Renuka Vithal. In addition to providing reviews on a regular basis, the IAB has the responsibility for advising the Editorial Panel on maintaining the international visibility and responsiveness of the journal. During the past year, using Internet capabilities and careful coordination of timing, we were able to involve members of the IAB in a portion of the regular meeting of the Editorial Board.

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M. Kathleen Heid

I recently attended a meeting of research journal editors at which we shared some of our practices and procedures. The editors represented a range of educational fields. Impressed by the nature and number of reviews that the JRME editorial office requests and receives, one of the editors of a non-mathematics-education journal offered this explanation: “That's because the mathematics education group is really a community.” Thinking about how good it made me feel to be a member of such a well-regarded community, I reflected on the remarkable work I had seen over the past year and a half from members of our community. During that time, we received 1687 reviews (give or take a few). I continue to be impressed by the careful and insightful reviews that constantly populate the JRME mailbox.

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M. Kathleen Heid

Journal for Research in Mathematics Education 1997, Vol. 28, No. 2, 130-162 Childrens Conceptual Structures for Multidigit Numbers and Methods of Multidigit Addition and Subtraction Karen C. Fuson, Northwestern University Diana Wearne, University of Delaware James C. Hiebert, University of Delaware Hanlie G. Murray, Un

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M. Kathleen Heid

SimCalc is an educational software and curriculum program designed to introduce students as young as middle school age to fundamental mathematical concepts—change and variation—that underpin the transition from algebra to calculus. The core underlying mathematical idea is the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and through activities involving change and variation, SimCalc students acquire contextualized, networked, and collaborative experience with the relationship between derivatives and antiderivatives. The program had been guided from its birth by the late James J. Kaput, a mathematics education leader who thrived by working on the leading edge of the field. This book reports not only on the theory on which SimCalc is based but also on more than 15 years of small-scale and large-scale research on the impact of SimCalc. It also includes thoughtprovoking discussions of the ways in which the SimCalc approach relates to other work on engaging students in mathematical thinking.