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Lindsay Reiten

Guiding questions and a task-analysis framework support teachers in using virtual manipulatives to enhance student understanding.

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Lindsay Reiten

The number of collections and the capabilities of virtual manipulatives (VMs) has grown considerably during the past twenty-plus years. A VM is “an interactive Web-based visual representation of a dynamic object that presents opportunities for constructing mathematical knowledge” (Moyer, Bolyard, and Spikell 2002). VMs come in a variety of platforms (e.g., java, html5, flash, cdf, etc.) and as apps for tablets (e.g., iPad and Android). Additionally, I consider preconstructed dynamic geometry objects (e.g., dynamic worksheets constructed and published using GeoGebra) as VMs due to the interactive nature of these dynamic objects.

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Lindsay Reiten and Susanne Strachota

A free tool encourages students to engage in the authentic practices of statistics and data analysis.

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Susanne Strachota and Lindsay Reiten

Numbers and statistical representations (e.g., graphs, charts, etc.) are often used to mislead people into believing an argument. For example, in fall 2014 Wisconsin was considering whether to raise the minimum wage. A radio commercial claimed, “Ninety-eight percent of the employers in this state are small-business owners….” The commercial suggested that the state's employers would face severe financial difficulties if the minimum wage were raised. We were struck by the misleading nature of this commercial: After all, ninety-eight percent of the employees in this state do not work for small-business owners.

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Nicole L. Fonger, Lindsay Reiten, Susanne Strachota and Zekiye Ozgur

Why should teachers engage in research studies? As a community, teachers and researchers are concerned with addressing critical issues in math education. NCTM's web resources and conferences, as well as the pages of this journal, give evidence of a growing community and an expanding body of work supporting NCTM's (2012) position of linking research and practice—a “border crossing” between the world of research and the world of teaching (Silver 2003). Despite these initiatives, an emerging issue remains: How do we work together to cultivate a two-way exchange of professional knowledge (Heid et al. 2006)?