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Ksenija Simic—Muller

Textbook tasks can easily be transformed into authentic real-world problems that shed light on issues of equity and fairness, such as population growth and crime rates.

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Joseph Muller and Ksenija Simic-Muller

What happens with cat populations when they are not controlled? Consider the case of Aoshima Island in Japan. Aoshima Island is called a cat island: Its cat population is 130 and growing; its human population is 13. The cats live in colonies and are fed and cared for by people who live on the islands.

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Ksenija Simic-Muller, Erin E. Turner and Maura C. Varley

An after-school mathematics program for Latino students focuses on field trips to explore the mathematical practices of the community's businesses.

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Julia M. Aguirre, Cynthia O. Anhalt, Ricardo Cortez, Erin E. Turner and Ksenija Simic-Muller

Two major challenges in mathematics teacher education are developing teacher understanding of (a) culturally responsive, social justice–oriented mathematics pedagogies and (b) mathematical modeling as a content and practice standard of mathematics. Although these challenges may seem disparate, the innovation described in this article is designed to address both challenges in synergistic ways. The innovation focuses on a mathematical modeling task related to the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan. Through qualitative analysis of instructor field notes, teachergenerated mathematical models, and teacher survey responses, we found that teachers who participated in the Flint Water Task (FWT) engaged in mathematical modeling and critical discussions about social and environmental justice. The evidence suggests that integrating these 2 foci–by using mathematical modeling to investigate and analyze important social justice issues–can be a high-leverage practice for mathematics teacher educators committed to equity-based mathematics education. Implications for integrating social justice and mathematical modeling in preservice and in-service mathematics teacher education are discussed.