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Melissa Graham and Kristin Lesseig

New teachers can immediately begin using these classroom-tested ways to incorporate mathematical argumentation in their classrooms on a daily basis.

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Melissa Boston, Jonathan Bostic, Kristin Lesseig and Milan Sherman

In this article, we provide information to assist mathematics teacher educators in selecting classroom observation tools. We review three classroom observation tools: (1) the Reform-Oriented Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP); (2) the Instructional Quality Assessment (IQA) in Mathematics; and (3) the Mathematical Quality of Instruction (MQI). We begin by describing each tool and providing examples of research studies or program evaluations using each tool. We then look across tools to identify each tool's specific focus, and we discuss how the features of each tool (and the protocol for its use) might serve as affordances or constraints in relation to the goals, purposes, and resources of a specific investigation. We close the article with suggestions for how each tool might be used by mathematics teacher educators to support teachers' learning and instructional change.

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Kristin Lesseig, Stephanie Casey, Debra Monson, Erin E. Krupa and Maryann Huey

Effective mathematics teaching involves eliciting and interpreting student thinking, and then using students' current understandings as a basis for instruction. Research indicates these skills are not innate but can be acquired through structured experiences. In this article, we describe the development and implementation of an interview module aimed at supporting secondary preservice teachers' ability to elicit and use evidence of student thinking. Analysis of preservice teachers' noticing of student thinking across components of the interview module demonstrated positive benefits of the assignment. We share our design considerations and results, and offer potential adaptations to the module for other mathematics methods instructors interested in using the module to develop secondary preservice teachers' ability to notice student thinking.