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Kathryn B. Chval

Most of the prospective teachers who enter my methods courses assume that teaching mathematics to elementary students will be easy. For example, Jenny wrote, “I thought, ‘I can teach math. How can it be so hard? It's elementary math!’ But I have been proven wrong.” Based on comments such as Jenny's, I realized the importance of giving prospective teachers opportunities to understand that effectively teaching mathematics to elementary students is complex and challenging. I recognized that field experience in my mathematics methods courses had to make the complexities of teaching more visible for prospective teachers. In other words, prospective teachers must study teaching practices. Such study would not only require viewing, analyzing, and discussing practices but also include the opportunity for prospective teachers to practice and analyze their own teaching.

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Rob Allen and Kathryn B. Chval

Facing a classroom of students with a plethora of academic and social needs, this fifth-grade teacher recognizes an obligation to analyze his teaching approach.

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Kathryn B. Chval and Óscar Chávez

A four-component process to teach mathematics to English language learners is explored. Research-based strategies within each example illustrate how research can be turned into practice.

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Kathryn B. Chval and Rachel J. Pinnow

A third-grade teacher orchestrates mathematical materials, tasks, and talk to engage her emergent bilingual learners and foster both academic content and linguistic development.

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John K. Lannin and Kathryn B. Chval

Use these specific strategies to confront assumptions about teaching and learning mathematics.

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Kathryn B. Chval and Sarah J. Hicks

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Kathryn B. Chval and Jane A. Davis

Teachers who differentiate learning with meaningful tasks for students at all levels can keep their entire class engaged.

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Kathryn B. Chval, John K. Lannin, Fran Arbaugh and Angela D. Bowzer

Educators who can elicit preservice teachers' beliefs about teaching mathematics can effectively challenge and change unrealistic expectations.

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Marilee Cameron, Jenine Loesing, Vickie Rorvig and Kathryn B. Chval

Analyzing student work can help teachers improve the teaching and learning of mathematics. This article describes professional development activities related to examining students' addition strategies in grades K–5.

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Kathryn B. Chval, Robert Reys, Barbara J. Reys, James E. Tarr and Óscar Chávez

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB, 2002) elevates the importance of educational research and thereby provides opportunities for mathematics education researchers in its support for and funding of rigorous research studies and its requirement of effective, research-based practices. At the same time, by demanding more of overburdened teachers and administrators, NCLB may exacerbate a long-standing gulf between educational research and practice. We use our recent experiences with conducting school-based research to illustrate how educational research can be impeded by the added demands of NCLB and other factors in the current climate. In addition, we hope to begin a dialogue that will encourage researchers and practitioners to work together to capitalize on NCLB's increased emphasis on educational research to create a systematic approach to bridging the research-practice gulf.