Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Joanne Caniglia x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Marcella McConnell and Joanne Caniglia

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio, is a 150,000-square-foot building that serves as the permanent home of rock and roll's most memorable experiences. Designed by internationally renowned architect Ieoh Ming Pei, the building rises above the shores of Lake Erie. “In designing this building,” Pei explained, “it was my intention to echo the energy of rock and roll. I have consciously used an architectural vocabulary that is bold and new, and I hope the building will become a dramatic landmark for the city of Cleveland and for fans of rock and roll around the world.”

Restricted access

Joanne C. Caniglia

The stunning natural beauty of Arizona, New Mexico, southern Colorado, and Utah is indicative of the American Southwest and is reflected in Southwestern baskets. Many Southwestern basket weavers use coiling as their method of construction (see fig. 1). The following problems relate mathematics to the art of basket weaving, with an emphasis on coiling.

Restricted access

Timothy McKeny and Joanne Caniglia

Students analyze a photograph to solve mathematical questions related to the images captured in the photograph. This month, the art of sculptor and painter Sol LeWitt is analyzed. Counting, combinatorics, and spatial visualization are among the mathematical themes evinced.

Restricted access

Joanne Caniglia

Restricted access

Ellen S. Hoffman and Joanne Caniglia

In her award-winning book The Good High School: Portraits of Character and Culture (1983), Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot chronicles the life and complexities of six high schools across the United States. Through these narratives she tells stories designed to move and persuade. “I believed I could capture the attention of my listeners by conveying what was good about those schools,” she relates. “If we could hear the story better, we'd be in better shape” (cited in de Cuevas 1996).

Restricted access

Barbara B. Leapard and Joanne C. Caniglia

A challenging activity for integrating mathematics and art using conic sections. Students create a drawing that is formed by the graphs of linear equations and conic sections and record the equations with domain and range for each. The art work incorporates graphing calculators and pencil and pencil and paper graphs.