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James J. Kaput

During the past two decades, corresponding roughly with the span over which the ideas and data of this book were assembled, a radical enrichment has occurred in our collective conception of what constitutes scientific activity and, therefore, what constitutes mathematics education research. These changes reflect participation in an even larger historical evolution that, while only in its infancy, has admitted new entities to the universe of discou rse and has asserted new domains to be subject to systematic inquiry.

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Maria L. Blanton and James J. Kaput

We present here results of a case study examining the classroom practice of one thirdgrade teacher as she participated in a long-term professional development project led by the authors. Our goal was to explore in what ways and to what extent the teacher was able to build a classroom that supported the development of students' algebraic reasoning skills. We analyzed 1 year of her classroom instruction to determine the robustness with which she integrated algebraic reasoning into the regular course of daily instruction and its subsequent impact on students' ability to reason algebraically. We took the diversity of types of algebraic reasoning, their frequency and form of integration, and techniques of instructional practice that supported students' algebraic reasoning as a measure of the robustness of her capacity to build algebraic reasoning. Results indicate that the teacher was able to integrate algebraic reasoning into instruction in planned and spontaneous ways that led to positive shifts in students' algebraic reasoning skills.

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James J. Kaput and Patrick W. Thompson

The first 25 years of the JRME overlap with the first decades of electronic technologies in education. Hence the growth of technology and research in mathematics education have tended to occur in parallel. But the interactions among mathematics education research, developments in technology. and the evolving nature of school mathematics and learning are complex. To some extent, the technology was superimposed on both school practice and research in mathematics education. On the other hand, it has become increasingly evident that the technology altered the nature of the activity using it.

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Maria L. Blanton and James J. Kaput

Helping teachers learn to identify and create opportunities for algebraic thinking as part of their normal classroom instruction.

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James J. Kaput, Judith E. Sims-Knight and John Clement

That behaviorist horse, although badly flogged, continues to stalk among us. The well-executed Wollman (1983) study provides a clear example of how psychological and educational behaviorism remains at work influencing both research objectives and methods—even among researchers who are patently not behaviorists. Now, however, one must look beneath the patina to find its effects.

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June Soares, Maria L. Blanton and James J. Kaput

“There is not enough time in the day to teach all subjects!” This is the cry heard in elementary schools all across the country. With testing and accountability on everyone's mind, teachers are looking for creative ways to teach all subjects. Literacy is on the top of the list for testing, so it seems to get top priority. But how can we make sure that mathematics, especially a crucial area such as algebraic thinking, is a priority as well?