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Hollylynne Stohl Drier

How third graders worked together to investigate relationships between fractions and percents using a spreadsheet tool. Highlights a student's creative approach to a proportion task.

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Karen Flanagan Hollebrands and Hollylynne Stohl

This month, we provide an example of a rich mathematical task that leads to many different connections. The task was posed to a class of high school seniors who were using a dynamic program for geometry called Cabri Geometry II. This tip includes directions for creating this problem with technology and suggestions for exploring it. The Cabri II software is available for Macintosh and PC computers from www.cabrilog.com/en or education.ti.com. It is also available for several different Texas Instruments calculators (TI-83 Plus, TI-83 Plus Silver, Voyage 200, TI-89, and TI-92 Plus). The program is similar to The Geometer's Sketchpad, and users who are familiar with The Geometer's Sketchpad should be able to easily adapt this task to use with it.

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Karen Flanagan Hollebrands and Hollylynne Stohl

This month's “Technology Tips” introduces readers to a powerful teacher-productivity tool. Mathematics teachers have needed inexpensive, easy-to-use software that allows them to create electronic documents that contain multiple representations. One such software package is TI-Interactive! (version 1.1, Texas Instruments, 2002). TI-Interactive is a word-processing tool that combines the features of a graphing calculator with the flexibility of a word-processing program, an equation editor, and a computer algebra system. This software tool gives mathematics teachers the power to create, modify, and share textbook-quality graphics and symbols. This “Technology Tip,” written by Robin L. Rider, is meant to introduce some of the commonly used features of the software. Future “Technology Tips” will explore more advanced features.

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Karen Flanagan Hollebrands and Hollylynne Stohl

AS MANY OF YOU PREPARE YOUR STUDENTS FOR ENDof-year examinations, you spend time creating review sheets and sample assessments. For this month's “Technology Tip,” Jeff Suzuki introduces readers to a powerful use of word processing and spreadsheet software that can help teachers design individualized worksheets and assessments. Jeff provides directions for using a function called Mail Merge in Microsoft Office. Although most productivity software groups (for example, ClarisWorks, Microsoft Works, and Office XP) have this type of merging function, the directions given in this “Technology Tip” are specific to Microsoft Office 2000. The process may be used with any software that has mail-merge capabilities and that allows a spreadsheet data file as input.

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Karen Flanagan Hollebrands and Hollylynne Stohl

IN THIS MONTH'S “TECHNOLOGY TIPS,” MARY ANN Connors introduces readers to the use of scripts on the TI-89, TI-92, TI-92 Plus, or Voyage 200 calculators. She demonstrates how teachers can create scripts to be used either during a whole-class calculator demonstration or by students while they engage in a mathematical exploration.

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Hollylynne Stohl and Suzanne R. Harper

Welcome to a new year of “Technology Tips.” I, Hollylynne Stohl, will edit the column for the 2004–2005 year. If you have a tip that can help other teachers learn how to use a technology application in the classroom, please send your ideas to me.

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Hollylynne Stohl and Suzanne R. Harper

In this month's “Technology Tips,” we introduce readers to some of the graphing capabilities of The Geometer's Sketchpad (Version 4.05, KCP Technologies 2001). You can download a free upgrade from Version 4.0, download an Instructor Evaluation Edition (60-day trial), or purchase a licensed copy from www.keypress.com/sketchpad. If you would like an overview of the software, you can download the Workshop Guide from www.keypress.com/sketchpad/ workshop_guide.html.

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Edited by Hollylynne Stohl and Suzanne Harper

Have you ever been working on your computer and wanted to capture an image of the screen so that you could show your work to someone else, perhaps your students? When mathematics teachers create technologybased lessons, they often need to create professional-looking documents—such as handouts, tests, Web pages, distanceeducation course materials, and “Technology Tips” manuscripts—that include images from work done on a computer. In this month's “Technology Tips,” we share some inexpensive or free ways that enable you to capture and use images in your work. The techniques that we describe can capture images of anything that is displayed on your computer monitor. In this example, the screen captures that we demonstrate are of a statistical exploration of SAT data in the software application Fathom (available from Key Curriculum Press at www.keypress.com/ fathom). The SAT data used can be found at the College Board's Web site (www.collegeboard.com/about/news_ info/cbsenior/yr2003/html/links.html).

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P. Holt Wilson, Hollylynne Stohl Lee and Karen F. Hollebrands

This study investigated the processes used by prospective mathematics teachers as they examined middle-school students' work solving statistical problems using a computer software program. Students' work on the tasks was captured in a videocase used by prospective teachers enrolled in a mathematics education course focused on teaching secondary mathematics with technology. The researchers developed a model for characterizing prospective teachers' attention to students' work and actions and interpretations of students' mathematical thinking. The model facilitated the identification of four categories: describing, comparing, inferring, and restructuring. Ways in which the model may be used by other researchers and implications for the design of pedagogical tasks for prospective teachers are discussed.