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Harold J. Fletcher

Easily one of the most ambitious educational projects ever undertaken, this TEA Study (Husén, 1967) not only assessed mathematical achievement internationnlly, but, more importantly, attempted to ascertain those variables related to that mathematical achievement. For their pioneering effort and generation of invaluable data, the committee that supervised this study must be gratefully commended. This paper will argue, however, that the published data analyses are almost totally inappropriate and, therefore, new analyses must be made if the results are to be interpreted in any meaningful way.

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Harold J. Fletcher

Romberg and Montgomery make the obvious point that “only items a student has had an opportunity to learn should be scored [p. 236]” in order to derive a more accurate index of efficiency. They admit, however, that without access to the original raw data I could not have computed such a score. Moreover they reason that my efficiency score and their proposed score should be highly correlated because the number of correctly answered items for which the student did not have an opportunity to learn (i.e., correct guesses) should be small and randomly distributed across subjects. Clearly, these were the simplifying assumptions underlying my efficiency score.