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Frank K. Lester Jr.

In the final issue (November 1992) of his term as editor of the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, Tom Carpenter noted that research in mathematics education has been undergoing a paradigm shift. Evidence of this shift is seen in the substantial increase in recent years in the number of research reports representing methodologies that have previously not been common in mathematics education. This increase is due in large part to Tom's receptiveness to publishing research based on alternative paradigms. Mo reover, as open as he was to increasing the scope of the journal, he insisted on doing so without lowering the standards of excellence that we have come to expect. Under Tom's capable guidance the journal has continued to grow in stature, and as a result, mathematics education research has continued to mature as a field of inquiry. As the new editor I will strive to uphold Tom's standards of editorial excellence while continuing to encourage a wide range of ideologies and methodologies.

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Frank K. Lester Jr.

“Editors certainly are fussy people!” moaned an author who phoned to discuss revisions to her recently accepted manuscript. “Putting a manuscript into publishable form requires attention to so many details!”

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Frank K. Lester Jr.

In the November 1971 issue of this journal, then-editor David Johnson drew the readers' attention to a new feature of the journal, “a selected annotated bibliography of research” prepared by Marilyn Suydam and Fred Weaver. Johnson went on to state that “present plans for JRME include provisions for the bibliography to appear as an annual fearure, published in each November issue.” The bibliography: which focused on research pertaining to precollege mathematics education, appeared annually in the November issue until 1976, when the addition of a July issue devoted to the bibliography expanded the journal from four to five issues per volume to accommodate the growing demand for more space to publish research reports: In that same issue the scope of the listing was extended to include postsecondary-level research.

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Frank K. Lester Jr.

In a Forum for Researchers article in the May 1993 issue of this journal, a committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction noted that “we in mathematics education have not been very reflective about the growing body of research we have been producing” (Sierpinska et al., 1993, p. 278). The committee insisted that, in order for the field of mathematics education to become more coherent. it will be necessary for the communjty to give much more attention to discussing the criteria that should be used to evaluate the results of our research efforts.

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Frank K. Lester Jr.

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Frank K. Lester Jr.

Within the past 25 years or so a new discipline has evolved from the confluence of research in such disparate disciplines as computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy, and psychology.

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Frank K. Lester Jr.

Those of us who have studied or taught mathematics at any level know that problem solving is at the heart of doing mathematics. In fact, many teachers and mathematicians would agree that doing mathematics is essentially solving problems. Assuming that problem solving is what mathematics is all about, there is no need for me to make a case in support of the increased emphasis that is being placed on problem solving in the elementary school mathematics curriculum.

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Frank K. Lester Jr.

Other articles in this issue present valuable ideas and points of view about learning and teaching concepts and skills involving rational numbers.

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Frank K. Lester Jr.

On extended constructed-response tasks, which required students to solve problems requiring a greater depth of understanding and then explain, at some length, specific features of their solutions, the average percentage of students producing satisfactory or better responses was 16 percent at grade 4, 8 percent at grade 8, and 9 percent at grade 12. (Dossey, Mullis, & Jones, 1993, p. 2)

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Frank K. Lester Jr. and Enrique Galindo

Like any organism that is alive and well, the JRME has been growing and changing throughout its 25 years. A recent editorial (May 1995) discussed changes in the number, type, and length of research reports that have been submitted in recent year. In this editorial we want to share ideas about some potentially even more radical changes in the journal—related to recent unprecedented growth of the world-wide “information superhighway.”