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Faiza M. Jamil

Spring is a great time for learning about nature and an even better time to learn math. Solving these math problems may help your students gear up for gardening and catching butterflies as cool, rainy days give way to colorful blooms and students become eager to spend time outside.

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Faiza M. Jamil

I appreciate the opportunity to respond to the thoughtful comments made by Alan Schoenfeld (2018) and Jon Star (2018) in their commentaries on replication studies in this issue of JRME, including their comments on our study of teacher expectancy effects (Jamil, Larsen, & Hamre, 2018). I have decided to write this rejoinder in the form of a personal reflection. As academics, we carry the tremendous burden of expertise, and perhaps that is partly why, as pointed out by Schoenfeld (2018), the academic reward system focuses so heavily on novelty and innovation. With our expertise, we are supposed to have all the answers, solve all the problems, and do so in brilliant, new ways. Replication studies are undervalued because they not only, by definition, recreate past research but, perhaps, also bring into question another scholar‧s expertise. Star (2018) even states that one of the three criteria of an outstanding replication study is that it “convincingly shows that there is reason to believe that the results of the original study may be flawed” (p. 99). Although this rigorous examination is precisely the way to build trust in the quality of our findings and move the field forward, it is also what makes it challenging to have candid conversations about what we do not know.

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Faiza M. Jamil, Ross A. Larsen and Bridget K. Hamre

The current study uses a large, nationally representative data set and a new method for computing teacher expectations to better understand the developmental effect of mathematics teacher expectations on future student achievement. The study utilizes autoregressive cross-lagged models with 5 time points between kindergarten and 8th grade as well as multigroup modeling to examine group differences in teacher expectancy effects on achievement for girls and minority students. Results indicate that students' experiences with teacher expectations from 1 time point to the next are not significantly associated with one another, but their association with future student achievement grows over time. Teacher expectancy effects in mathematics are stronger for White girls, minority girls, and minority boys than they are for White boys. Implications for teaching are discussed.