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Diana L. Moss

In this task, students predict the number of snow days by counting beans in a jar, a Native American method. Each month, elementary school teachers are presented with a problem along with suggested instructional notes; asked to use the problem in their own classrooms; and encouraged to report solutions, strategies, reflections, and misconceptions to the journal audience.

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Diana L. Moss and Lisa Poling

Students explore the mathematics found in chocolate production.

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Jennifer A. Czocher and Diana L. Moss

Have you ever thought about teaching mathematics through making connections to logic and philosophy? This article presents the Snail problem, a relatively simple challenge about motion that offers engaging extensions involving the notion of infinity. It encourages students in grades 5–9 to connect mathematics learning to logic, history, and philosophy through analyzing the problem, making sense of quantitative relationships, and modeling with mathematics (NGAC 2010). It also gives students of all ages a glimpse into the development of mathematics by introducing a reason to think about infinite convergent series.

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Teruni Lamberg, Linda Gillette-Koyen and Diana Moss

Formative assessment helps teachers make effective instructional decisions to support students to learn mathematics. Yet, many teachers struggle to effectively use formative assessment to support student learning. Therefore, teacher educators must find ways to support teachers to use formative assessment to inform instruction. This case study documents shifts in teachers’ views and reported use of formative assessment that took place as they engaged in professional development (PD). The PD design considered the formative assessment cycle (Otero, 2006; Popham, 2008) and embedded it within a pedagogical framework (Lamberg, 2013, in press) that took into account the process of mathematics planning and teaching while supporting teachers to learn math content. Teachers restructured their definition of student understanding, which influenced how they interpreted student work and made instructional decisions. Teachers’ pre-PD instructional decisions focused on looking for right and wrong answers to determine mastery and focused on pacing decisions. Their post-PD decisions focused on student thinking and adapting teaching to support student thinking and learning. Implications for PD to support teachers to use formative assessment and research are discussed.

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Diana L. Moss and W. Max Sabo

Students take on the role of a real estate agent, decomposing a complex polygon into familiar shapes to calculate a house's square footage based on the exterior-walls floor plan.

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Jennifer A. Czocher and Diana L. Moss

Along with previous learning, general knowledge and personal encounters influenced students when the Letter Carrier problem was delivered to them.

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Diana L. Moss, Jennifer A. Czocher and Teruni Lamberg

For these sixth graders, transitioning from arithmetic to algebraic thinking involved developing new meanings for symbols in expressions and equations.

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Jennifer A. Czocher, Diana L. Moss and Luz A. Maldonado

Conventional word problems can't help students build mathematical modeling skills. on their own. But they can be leveraged! We examined how middle and high school students made sense of word problems and offer strategies to question and extend word problems to promote mathematical reasoning.

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Beth L. MacDonald, Diana L. Moss, and Jessica H. Hunt

In this article, we explore how playing with dominoes not only requires students to count but also to subitize when constructing number and operations.