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Daniel Chazan

Four important themes presented in the K–12 Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics (Standards) (NCTM 1989) are mathematics as problem solving, mathematics as communication, mathematics as reasoning, and mathematical connections. The high school component also stresses mathematical structure. Furthermore, the Standards calls for new roles for teachers and students and suggests that microcomputer technology can help support teachers and students in taking on these new roles.

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Daniel Chazan and Dara Sandow

Secondary school mathematics teachers are often exhorted to incorporate reasoning into all mathematics courses. However, many feel that a focus on reasoning is easier to develop in geometry than in other courses. This article explores ways in which reasoning might naturally arise when solving equations in algebra courses.

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Orly Buchbinder, Daniel I. Chazan, and Michelle Capozzoli

Many research studies have sought to explain why NCTM's vision for mathematics classrooms has not had greater impact on everyday instruction, with teacher beliefs often identified as an explanatory variable. Using instructional exchanges as a theoretical construct, this study explores the influence of teachers' institutional positions on the solving of equations in algebra classrooms. The experimental design uses surveys with embedded rich-media representations of classroom interaction to surface how teachers appraise correct solutions to linear equations where some solutions follow suggested textbook procedures for solving linear equations and others do not. This paper illustrates the feasibility of studying teaching with rich-media surveys and suggests new ways to support changes in everyday mathematics teaching.

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Daniel Chazan, Patricio Herbst, Sandra Crespo, Percival G. Matthews, and Erin K. Lichtenstein

The previous two editorials in this volume (Herbst, Crespo, et al., 2021 in Issue 2 and Herbst, Chazan, et al., 2021 in Issue 3) have discussed two kinds of infrastructure that would be valuable for the field of mathematics education research to develop: physical (or virtual) assets and personnel with technical expertise. As an elaboration of the former, which included shareable data sets, and the latter, which spoke of research practices, this editorial considers elements of an infrastructure that can support research that situates mathematics education research as a practice occurring in specific places and times.

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Patricio Herbst, Daniel Chazan, Sandra Crespo, Percival G. Matthews, and Erin K. Lichtenstein

The preparation of mathematics education researchers is important to the long-term health and the growth of our field of scholarship. Although doctoral preparation in mathematics education supports individuals’ personal advancement and helps employers fill their ranks, its function for our scholarly field cannot be underestimated. Inasmuch as mathematics education researchers steward the growth of knowledge about mathematics education and the place that our field has among fields of scholarly knowledge, creating intellectual communities that can apprentice newcomers in the practices of research in mathematics education seems critical. In the last issue’s editorial (Herbst et al., 2021), we reflected

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Joel Amidon, Daniel Chazan, Dana Grosser-Clarkson, and Elizabeth Fleming

This article explores the ways in which a teacher educator uses digital technology to create a virtual field placement as a way to blur the boundaries between a university methods course and teacher candidates' field placements. After describing his goals for the course, the teacher educator provides a description of three LessonSketch experiences his teacher candidates complete in this virtual field placement site and how these experiences create opportunities for teacher candidates to learn to teach mathematics. The design process and choices of these virtual field placement experiences are explored via interviews with the first author. Reflecting on these LessonSketch experiences, all of the authors then explore affordances of virtual and hybrid placements as resources for supplementing real placements and bridging theory/practice divides in teacher education.

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Patricio Herbst, Daniel Chazan, Sandra Crespo, Percival G. Matthews, and Erin K. Lichtenstein

As editors of a major journal in our field, we read many manuscripts, most of which never successfully pass peer review to appear in the pages of the journal. One of the most frequent unmet expectations JRME reviewers have is that manuscripts will make a significant contribution to the field. Reviewers often ask authors to clarify what the contribution of a manuscript is and why the work is worth the attention of the field at large. Some authors seem puzzled by the question—after all, they have identified research questions tied to problems documented in the literature, as well

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Sandra Crespo, Patricio Herbst, Erin K. Lichtenstein, Percival G. Matthews, and Daniel Chazan

In this editorial, we focus on the movement within our field to attend more explicitly to issues of equity in mathematics education research. When Beatriz D’Ambrosio et al. (2013) introduced a JRME special issue on equity in mathematics education, 1 they seemed to suggest that the journal was lagging in the extent to which it covered the equity-focused research being done in mathematics education. Hence, a goal of that special issue was to broaden and deepen our collective understanding of equity-focused research. In the intervening 8 years, out of the 233 articles JRME has

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Patricio Herbst, Daniel Chazan, Sandra Crespo, Percival G. Matthews, and Erin K. Lichtenstein

In past editorials (e.g., Herbst et al., 2021), we have discussed several aspects of our field’s research infrastructure. Journals such as JRME are key elements of the infrastructure of a field of research: As institutions, journals curate, disseminate, and archive the research output of a field. To accomplish that, many individuals and practices are needed. A salient practice in the production of journal articles is that of peer review, to which we dedicate this editorial.

From a journal-centric perspective, the peer review process supports the production of the journal by helping editors select content to be