Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for

  • Author or Editor: Cynthia W. Langrall x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Cynthia W. Langrall

As we begin a new calendar year and launch a new volume of JRME, it seems an appropriate time to reflect on the status of the journal and the changes that have been recently instituted in the submission and review process.

Restricted access

Cynthia W. Langrall

As a prelude to the 2014 NCTM Research Conference, “Linking Research and Practice,” I take this opportunity to remind the JRME community about the responsibility that we, as researchers, bear in linking research and practice. I also make some suggestions about the role that JRME might play in this work.

Restricted access

Cynthia W. Langrall

December is typically the time for year-in-review reflections, but given the publication schedule for JRME, a report of the status of the journal falls to the January issue. It has been a productive year for JRME. The number of manuscript submissions has increased by 17% when compared to this same time period last year.1 Although we are pleased to be receiving more submissions, the increase in manuscripts has not increased the acceptance rate. In fact, the acceptance rate for all manuscripts submitted to JRME has dropped from 8% to about 6%. However, the rate of acceptance for manuscripts that were fully reviewed (i.e., were appropriate for the journal but did not receive a desk reject decision or were not editorially reviewed2) was considerably greater, at about 22%. It is noteworthy that the majority of accepted manuscripts were resubmissions of papers that had previously received “revise and resubmit” decisions. This is a good indicator that the review process has been effective in providing authors with the kind of constructive criticism that can help them craft a publishable manuscript. Moreover, it points to the important role that reviewers play in the publication process.

Restricted access

Cynthia W. Langrall

Once again, the wheels of change are turning at JRME. This issue marks the beginning of Volume 47, which will be the last volume under my editorship. To facilitate the transition to the new editor, there is a 1–year period during which the work of the journal is shared by the editor and the editor–designate. I am pleased to announce that Jinfa Cai, Professor of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Delaware, is the JRME editor–designate. His term as JRME editor will span Volumes 48–51, from 2017–2020.

Restricted access

Cynthia W. Langrall

For the last 4.5 years, I have been immersed in the work of editing the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education. I could talk for hours about reading manuscripts and reviews, writing decision letters, interacting with authors, editing manuscripts to prepare them for publication, my reflections on the research that has been published in the journal, and my reflections on the research that has not been published, but this talk is not about me. I want to focus on the journal itself, its past and its future, and what it means to us–the mathematics education research community. Also, I will be talking about unicorns, mastodons, and ants. So bear with me, this will not be a typical math ed. talk (and I might have gotten a little carried away with the mastodons). Let's begin this tale.

Restricted access

Cynthia W. Langrall

In today's world, data and statistical information permeate our lives, making it imperative that we educate students to be statistically literate. Statistical literacy is the ability to read and interpret statistical information to make informed decisions about events under conditions of uncertainty. Recently, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) published a document, Catalyzing Change in High School Mathematics: Initiating Critical Conversations (2018), in which it proposed statistics as one of four essential content domains in secondary school mathematics and acknowledged quantitative literacy—the ability to reason both statistically and numerically—as a crucial life skill for all students. For a number of years, statistics has been an important content strand across grade levels in the school mathematics curricula of many countries. Thus, it is understandable that students and even teachers might perceive statistics simply as another topic in mathematics.

Restricted access

Chepina Rumsey and Cynthia W. Langrall

These evidence-based instructional strategies can lead to deeper mathematical conversations in upper elementary school classrooms.

Restricted access

Cynthia W. Langrall and Jane Swafford

Ellen, Jim, and Steve bought three helium-filled balloons and paid $2 for all three. They decided to go back to the store and buy enough balloons for everyone in the class.

Restricted access

Jane O. Swafford and Cynthia W. Langrall

The purpose of this study was to investigate 6th-grade students' use of equations to describe and represent problem situations prior to formal instruction in algebra. Ten students were presented with a series of similar tasks in 6 different problem contexts representing linear and nonlinear situations. The students in this study showed a remarkable ability to generalize the problem situations and to write equations using variables, often in nonstandard form. Although students were often able to write equations, they rarely used their equations to solve related problems. We describe students' preinstructional uses of equations to generalize problem situations and raise questions about the most appropriate curriculum for building on students' intuitive knowledge of algebra.

Restricted access

Cynthia W. Langrall, Tami S. Martin, Nerida F. Ellerton, Joshua T. Hertel and Amanda L. Fain

There are many venues for engaging in scholarly discourse about mathematics education, including conferences, webinars, social networking sites, blogs, university classes, and colloquia. Given the dynamic nature of these forums, one might lose sight of the role of academic journals in contributing to scholarly discourse in the field. The integrity of JRME and the high standards to which its publications are held support the notion of the journal as an archive, a means for recording and disseminating knowledge. However, JRME also influences the direction of mathematics education research and contributes to the ongoing discourse of the mathematics education community.