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Cathery Yeh

Postscript items are designed as rich “grab-and-go” resources that any teacher could quickly incorporate into his or her classroom repertoire with little effort and maximum impact. The current article shares ideas for using Pattern Blocks to increase students' creativity and problem solving skills while extending their understanding of geometric reasoning and number sense.

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Cathery Yeh

Number Sleuth, a math scavenger hunt game, encourages problem solving and computations. Variations in the article include ways to adapt the game across grade levels. Postscript items are designed as rich grab-and-go resources that any teacher can quickly incorporate into their classroom repertoire with little effort and maximum impact.

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Cathery Yeh

A picture can serve as a powerful tool for students to investigate the mathematics in their everyday lives. Share a photo of something students experience regularly in their communities: a local restaurant menu, a bus ticket, or even a bowl of fruit. Ask students to find the mathematics in the picture. Start by brainstorming as a class, paying close attention to the numerical or geometric aspects of the photo. Allow students to work as partners or in groups to create problems relevant to the context.

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Cathery Yeh

Children use sharing of familiar food items to facilitate their understanding of mixed numbers. Postscript items are designed as rich grab-and-go resources that any teacher can quickly incorporate into their classroom repertoire with little effort and maximum impact.

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Cathery Yeh and Theodore Chao

Students come to school with varying degrees of prior mathematics experiences, understandings, and levels of confidence—all of which can be challenging for teachers. Below are three strategies based on Universal Design for Learning (cast.org) to highlight and leverage the mathematical brilliance of all children, including children with dis/abilities.

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Mark Ellis and Cathery Yeh