Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for

  • Author or Editor: Anne Quinn x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Anne Quinn

StatKey, a free Web-based app, supplies real data to help with the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, and much more.

Restricted access

Anne Quinn

The paper discusses technology that can help students master four triangle centers -- circumcenter, incenter, orthocenter, and centroid. The technologies are a collection of web-based apps and dynamic geometry software. Through use of these technologies, multiple examples can be considered, which can lead students to generalizations about triangle centers.

Restricted access

Anne Quinn

After joining social media last year, I was impressed with the potential for “real-life” mathematics. Opening several social media accounts, I was surprised that LinkedIn® could quickly locate my middle school friends from their 500,000,000 users worldwide (LinkedIn 2017). They also suggested ways to make introductions to people “two degrees” (“friends of friends”) or “three degrees” away (“friends of friends of friends”). Likewise, with only two friends and a desire to stay under the radar, Facebook® gave me suggestions for hundreds of “friends of friends.” Even with hundreds of millions of users on each site, it was easy to imagine that we might all be connected by “six degrees.”

Restricted access

Anne Quinn

While looking for an inexpensive Web application to illustrate the Central Limit theorem, I found the Rossman/Chance Applet Collection, a group of free Web-based statistics apps. In addition to illustrating the Central Limit theorem, the apps could be used to cover many classic statistics concepts, including confidence intervals, regression, and a virtual version of the popular Reese's® Pieces problem. The apps allow users to investigate concepts using either preprogrammed or original data.

Restricted access

Anne Quinn

When looking for a simple activity to show eighth-grade students at the Hour of Code (a global activity for students) in December, I became familiar with an app called SoloLearn: Learn to Code (SoloLearn 2018). In fact, it was an eighth-grade student who introduced me to it. The program is simple enough that students can produce their first programs in minutes and comprehensive enough that users can progress through many levels as they master any of several computerprogramming languages. The twelve languages are C++, Java, Python, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, SQL, Ruby, JQuery, C#, and Swift. Various applied mathematics classes at the college level assume a basic knowledge of programming, and having this skill can open many careers for students. Coding also can serve as an enrichment activity for algebra students.

Restricted access

Anne Quinn

An inexpensive dynamic graph theory app can be used for matrix representations, planar graphs, Platonic solids, and more.

Restricted access

Cris Wellington and Anne Quinn

Los Angeles has always been home to some of the world's most expensive real estate. But forget Beverly Hills, 90210: The new hot spot for multimilliondollar mansions is Duarte, 91008….

Restricted access

Anne Quinn and Karen Larson

The free Web-based app Census at School allows random sampling of survey data for students' use in projects and statistical analysis.

Restricted access

Anne Larson Quinn

Many students find proofs frustrating, and teachers struggle with how to help students write proofs. In fact, it is well documented that most students who have studied proofs in high school geometry courses do not master them and do not understand their function (Battista 2007; Harel and Sowder 2007). And yet, according to NCTM's Principles and Standards for School Mathematics(2000), “By the end of secondary school, students should be able to understand and produce mathematical proofs … and should appreciate the value of such arguments” (p. 56).

Restricted access

Cynthia Barb and Anne Larson Quinn

What role does problem solving play in the mathematics classroom today? What methods should be used to help students become better problem solvers?