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Ann Wheeler and Joe Champion

Peg students' knowledge about probability by using a common manipulative to connect number sense, geometry, and algebraic thinking.

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Joe Champion and Ann Wheeler

A classic manipulative, used since the 1960s, continues to offer opportunities for intriguing problem solving involving proportions.

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Ann Wheeler and Joe Champion

This article details the use of an activity connecting science, art, and literature to teach the concept of area.

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Ann Blomquist and Pamela Wheeler Steman

All teachers know the difficulties inherent in their absence from school, even for a day. Too frequently when the teacher is absent the students end up doing busy work or the' substitute doesn't know how to explain the material, so the day is lost to academic instruction.

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Ann Wheeler, Carole Hayata and Winifred Mallam

Using children's literature to stimulate mathematics learning is by no means a novel idea. Myriad books by wellknown authors, such as Stuart Murphy and Cindy Neuschwander, not only engage the readers but also spark students' interest in learning mathematics. The combination of literature, mathematics, and well-developed classroom activities with discussion can transform a student into a problem solver who engages in conceptually driven learning (NCTM 2000). In our article, we discuss the use of a pen pal book project that began with the creation of mathematics-themed children's books by pre-K-8 preservice teachers. The intended audience for the books was sixth-grade students. In this collaborative partnership, the books created by the preservice teachers were then presented to sixth-grade students who read the stories; solved the problems posed; and critiqued the overall content, readability, and relevance of the story topics.