Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Julie M. Amador x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Julie M. Amador and Terence Soule

To increase digital literacy and mathematical fluency, students electronically piece together details of computer coding by creating and animating sprites.

Restricted access

Darrell Earnest and Julie M. Amador

Share news about happenings in the field of elementary school mathematics education, views on matters pertaining to teaching and learning mathematics in the early childhood or elementary school years, and reactions to previously published opinion pieces or articles. Find detailed department submission guidelines at http://www.nctm.org/WriteForTCM.

Restricted access

Julie M. Amador, David Glassmeyer and Aaron Brakoniecki

This article provides a framework for integrating professional noticing into teachers' practice as a means to support instructional decisions. An illustrative example is included based on actual use with secondary students.

Restricted access

Ryan Gillespie, Julie M. Amador, and Abraham Wallin

Rigorous assessments might be stripping students of their ability to know before a classroom assessment whether their learning is proficient.

Restricted access

Kathy E. Prummer, Julie M. Amador and Abraham J. Wallin

A scaling task that incorporates rectangular prisms can net an increase in students' geometric understanding.

Restricted access

Leslie Dietiker, Lorraine M. Males, Julie M. Amador and Darrell Earnest

Building on the work of Professional Noticing of Children's Mathematical Thinking, we introduce the Curricular Noticing Framework to describe how teachers recognize opportunities within curriculum materials, understand their affordances and limitations, and use strategies to act on them. This framework builds on Remillard's (2005) notion of participation with curriculum materials, connects with and broadens existing research on the relationship between teachers and written curriculum, and highlights new areas for research. We argue that once mathematics educators better understand the strategic curricular practices that support ambitious teaching, which we refer to as professional curricular noticing, such knowledge could lead to recommendations for how to support the curricular work of teachers and novice teachers in particular.

Restricted access

Julie M. Amador, Anne Estapa, Zandra de Araujo, Karl W. Kosko and Tracy L. Weston

In an effort to elicit elementary preservice teachers' mathematical noticing, mathematics teacher educators at 6 universities designed and implemented a 3-step task that used video, writing, and animation. The intent of the task was to elicit preservice teachers' mathematical noticing–that is, noticing specific to mathematics content and how students reason about content. Preservice teachers communicated their noticing through both written accounts and selfcreated animations. Findings showed that the specific city of mathematical noticing differed with the medium used and that preservice teachers focused on different mathematical content across the methods sections, illuminating the importance for mathematics teacher educators understanding of the noticing practices of the preservice teachers with whom they work. This report includes implications for using the task in methods courses and modifying course instruction to develop noticing following task implementation.