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Edited by Douglas H. Clements, Peter Kloosterman, Carol Novillis Larson and Janet Parker

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Peter Kloosterman, Carol Novillis Larson and Janet Parker

Edited by Douglas H. Clements

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Douglas H. Clements, Peter Kloosterman, Carol Novillis Larson and Janet Parker

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Douglas H. Clements, Karen C. Fuson and Julie Sarama

We respond to a call to analyze issues of curriculum standards and to present alternative storylines by addressing criticisms of the Common Core State Standards in early childhood. We describe a storyline from multiple media and evaluate this storyline's criticisms, focusing on the criticism that the standards are developmentally inappropriate. We review research and conclude that the criticism is invalid and may reflect a historical belief in the primacy of development over learning rather than the research record. Misinterpreting or ignoring relevant research has equity consequences because it may particularly harm those children most in need of learning support in learning grade-level mathematics. Fortunately, theory and research illuminate learning trajectories that help all children meet these standards.

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Douglas H. Clements, Julie Sarama, Carolyn Layzer, Fatih Unlu and Lily Fesler

Early education is replete with debates about “academic” versus “play” approaches. We evaluated 2 interventions, the Building Blocks (BB) mathematics curriculum and the BB synthesized with scaffolding of play to promote executive function (BBSEF), compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) control using a 3-armed cluster randomized trial with more than 1,000 children in 84 preschool classrooms across three districts (multiracial or multiethnic, low income, 27% English Language Learner). Impact estimates for BBSEF were mixed in sign, small in magnitude, and insignificant. Most impact estimates for BB were positive, but only a few were statistically significant, with more in the kindergarten year (delayed effects), including both mathematics achievement and executive function (EF) competencies. Gains in both mathematics and EF can be mutually supportive and thus resist the fade-out effect.

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Douglas H. Clements, Barbara Wilmot and Thomas O'Shea

Prices on software, books, and materials are subject to change. Consult the suppliers for the current prices. The comments reflect the reviewer's opinions and do not imply endorsement by the Notional Council of Teochers of Mathematics.

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Carmen S. Brown, Julie Sarama and Douglas H. Clements

Learning trajectories (routes, curves) in preschool and how they helped a teacher develop goals and objectives for her students' mathematical knowledge. Learning trajectories have three parts: a mathematical goal, a developmental path, and a set of activities matched to each of those levels. Activities and a teacher's explanation are included.

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Douglas H. Clements, Julie Sarama and Ann-Marie DiBiase

NCTM's Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (2000) addresses preschool mathematics education, which is a first for the NCTM's Standards documents. We celebrate this initial coverage but wonder whether Principles and Standards has enough detail for early childhood teachers and caregivers. We are concerned that although the document offers a good start, it might not provide sufficient guidelines. Without these guidelines, we face the danger that a wide variety of incoherent standards will be produced, some of which may be developmentally inappropriate. A lack of consistency across various standards and guidelines will continue to result in “mile wide and inch deep” curricula (National Center for Education Statistics 1996) as publishers struggle to meet a variety of different content standards and guidelines. Because we believe in the importance of supporting early communication and coordinating efforts among educational leaders and agencies, we held a national Conference on Standards for Preschool and Kindergarten Mathematics Education in May 2000, in Arlington, Virginia.

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Candace Joswick, Douglas H. Clements, Julie Sarama, Holland W. Banse and Crystal A. Day-Hess

Modify activities according to these principles and suggestions.

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Erna Yackel, Paul Cobb, Terry Wood, Graceann Merkel and Michael T. Battista

Edited by Douglas H. Clements

Over the past five years, we have collaborated with teachers to develop forms of instructional practice in elementary chool mathematics that are compatible with a constructivist view of teaching and learning. Two key aspects of our work form the basis for this discu ion: first, the process of developing in tructional activities, and second. the importance of engaging students in mathematical discussion.